Category: GastoniaNC-111

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

If you’re thinking of buying a car franchise (that is, some franchise related to cars), we have some advice. And before we offer our advice, we’ll address the elephant in the room. No need to be cagey. We think buying a Tread Connection franchise is a smart strategy. That is, if you’re thinking of buying a franchise — and you want your franchise to involve helping motorists.

 If you’re looking for a car franchise, we hope you’ll contact Tread Connection to discuss franchising opportunities.

Cars are getting more sophisticated.

We don’t need to tell you that, but what this means for you is that if you’re thinking of buying a car-related franchise that fixes cars, that’s getting harder and harder to do. As cars end up having more sophisticated technology, many independent garages — and even national chains — are finding that they don’t have access to mechanical and electronic repair data that they need to do work on customers’ cars.

In other words, more and more, when a motorist wants to do something more complicated than an oil change or getting their tires put on, they’re going to the dealer. That may be a future problem for some car-related franchises that focus on engine repair.

Now, that may change eventually, and we hope it does. Voters in Massachusetts recently passed a measure forcing automakers to offer better access to the data that independent garages need. Still, that’s the nice thing about the tire business. Tread Connection (and, yes, other tire franchises) can stay out of the dealers versus car mechanics fight.

Cars are getting heavier.

Consumer desire for more space, luxury, and power from their vehicles have grown the literal size of vehicles, making them larger and heavier, and with heavier cars come larger tires that need to be replaced more often. While the sophistication of cars is changing the approach of many mechanics, cars’ external needs continue to be high demand, be it decaling, tire and wheel maintenance, or even detailing.

Car repair is almost recession- and pandemic-proof.

Obviously, when the economy is hammered and thrown into the blender, the way it has been in 2020, every business is hurt. Well, if you make masks and hand sanitizer, currently, you’re sitting pretty. But essentially, yes, every business is going to be banged up.

But people can’t put off getting tires forever, and they don’t and won’t, and market trends back that up. According to Allied Market Research, the global automotive tire market was valued at $112 billion in 2019 and is projected to hit $154.40 billion by 2027. In other words, the tire industry is an essential business. Where some franchises have been extremely damaged by the pandemic — think of escape room franchises or entertainment center franchises — people are still buying tires. It’s a need versus a want (or a “might be nice to have”).

Work with a business you feel good about.

That may be the most important thing. We think you’ll find a lot to like about Tread Connection. It’s a company that marries services and convenience, two features that our competitors often ignore. (Think about all the times you’ve had to take your car to a garage and wait in a waiting room for repairs, or worse, have a family member or friend with another car take you home, so you can come to the garage the next day to pick up your car, and to do so, you’ll need a ride.)

People want convenience. We think that’s a trend that’s not going to go away. Tread Connection, of course, comes to the customer to install tires. Meanwhile, the lack of a brick and mortar location makes it a far more cost-effective business for our franchisees.

So if you’re thinking of buying a car-related franchise, Tread Connection might be the best place to start.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

If you don’t think about tires often, you probably don’t know your tire’s size. Why would you? And yet, whenever in the past you shop tires and tire services, it’s probably the first question asked. Invariably, the question is: “What tire size would you like?”

And that’s when many of us will come up with a clever retort like, “Uh…” Or maybe: “Er…”

So if you’re looking to have a ready answer, we’ll walk you through how to determine your tire size. Of course, if you are not interested in learning how to calculate tire size, and you just want somebody from Tread Connection to tell you what tire size you need and then install the tires, well, hey, we can do that, too.

But if you are interested in calculating tire sizes, here we go.

How to determine your tire size

You’ll need to find some important numbers in order to calculate your tire size — but that isn’t difficult. The numbers, as you might expect, are on the sides of your tires. If it’s too faint to read, or you just don’t feel like stooping down to look at your tires, you’ll possibly also find the numbers on the driver’s side door jamb, the glove box door, or on the gas tank hatch, and failing that, it’ll be in your vehicle’s owner’s manual.

You’re going to see an alphabet soup’s worth of letters and numbers, like (just as an example), P205/60R15 82S. Consider this your tire size code, and we’ll help you crack it.

  • Tire Type. Chances are, you probably will have a “P” on the tire. That stands for “passenger vehicle tire.” That would include vehicles like SUVs, minivans, and even small pickup trucks. If you see an “LT,” you have a larger vehicle. It stands for “light truck tire,” the type of truck that can tow a trailer or has a 1-ton load capacity. “ST” stands for “Special Trailer.” Those are tires for trailers. If there’s no letter, you have a metric tire, which is known as a European size.
  • Tire Width. In our example, the width is 205 millimeters.
  • Aspect Ratio. That would be the 60 in our example. The aspect ratio is the percentage that compares the tire’s section height with the tire’s section width. So, in this case, the tire’s section height is 60 percent of the tire’s section width. Confusing, yes, but the main thing to remember here is that, if safety is your primary concern, you want the aspect ratio to be 70 or a lower number. You’ll get better steering and better overall handling.
  • Construction Type. In our example, the “R” is next. That stands for radial construction. If you see a “B,” that means belted bias. A “D” is diagonal bias construction. Odds are, you have radial tires. Radial ply construction is an industry standard, for what it’s worth.
  • Wheel Diameter. The next number in our example is “15.” That’s the diameter of the wheel rim, which is usually measured in inches.
  • Load Index. Next in the example is “82,” which is a number that you use in a chart, which will tell you how much weight your car can carry.
  • Speed Rating. The last letter – “S” is our example – you use with another chart, and it’ll tell you how fast your car can go before your tires start to have a problem, like a blowout. An “S,” in this case, means that your car could go 112mph before your tires would possibly, well, explode.

How to calculate your tire size

So that was a lot of information, and maybe your eyes are glazed over, and your brain feels as if it’s fogging up.

But if that still seems too overwhelming, just contact the TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection. We can help you quickly calculate your tire size. Not to worry.

Another helpful hint — you’ll want to stay within 3 percent of the diameter and height of the original tire. If you go further, you could have trouble with your brakes. Again, if this is confusing, and it often is to anybody who isn’t immersed in tires, a Tread Connection representative can help you with that.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

You’ve got a lot on your mind, and probably the last thing you typically think about is your tire speed rating. But if you’re in the market for tire services, that’s not a bad thing to know. Even if you’re not looking for new tires any time soon, it’s a good thing to understand what a tire speed rating is.

What Is a Tire Speed Rating And Why Should You Care?

In a nutshell, it’s a rating that indicates the maximum speed that tires can safely maintain over time.

While speed limits can vary across the country (and around the world), the speed rating on a tire has a lot more to do with matching the speed capability of the tire to the top speed capability of the car to which they’re applied. The higher the speed rating, the better control and handling you can expect at higher speeds – basically it’s that the tires can take the heat.

How to Determine What Tire Speed Rating is Right for Your Car

You can find your tire speed rating in your car. Generally, you’ll find it on the driver’s side door jamb or sometimes in the glove box door or on the gas tank hatch, and if you don’t see it there, it’ll definitely be in your vehicle’s owner manual.

Now, you may see the tire speed rating on, say, the driver’s side door jamb and not even realize you’re looking at it. You may see a lot of numbers and letters, like P205/60R15 82S. Don’t worry about all of them. The main thing you’ll want to know is that the “S” signifies the tire speed rating, and the 82 is your load index, which corresponds with how much weight the car can carry.

If it sounds confusing, it is. After all, an “S” isn’t a speed, and 82 pounds sounds like not much weight at all. But if you’re thinking you can only go S miles per hour and carry 82 pounds, as you’ve likely surmised, you’re reading it wrong.

Deciphering the Tire Speed Rating and Load Index

First of all, if you don’t want to decipher the tire speed rating or load index, you don’t have to. If you see that you have an 82S at the end of those numbers and letters, or perhaps a 91V or a 99Y and so on, and you don’t want to bother with thinking too hard about all of this, just make sure that the tires you get are the same as what you’re seeing on the driver’s side door jamb, glove box door, gas tank hatch or vehicle’s owner manual (wherever you found it).

You can call your local Tread Connection franchise, and they’ll be able to help you.

But if you do want to go into the weeds, as you look at 82S or 91V or whatever those last two numbers and letter is, you’ll want to flip through your vehicle owner’s manual and look for two charts.

The S, V, Y, or other letters that you’ll see is your speed rating, and it will correspond with a speed.

What Are the Speed Ratings for Tires?

We’ll give them all to you here, so you don’t have to look it up.

  • L is 75 miles per hour
  • M is 81 miles per hour
  • N is 87 miles per hour
  • P is 93 miles per hour
  • Q is 99 miles per hour
  • R is 106 miles per hour
  • S is 112 miles per hour
  • T is 118 miles per hour
  • U is 124 miles per hour
  • H is 140 miles per hour
  • V is 149 miles per hour
  • Z is over 149 miles per hour
  • W is 168 miles per hour
  • Y is 186 miles per hour

The load index also corresponds with a chart, which you’ll find in your book. These charts are insanely long and heavy on numbers, and so we’ll spare you from wading through it all, but basically if your load index is, say, 96, you’d be able to look for the pounds the car can carry, and in this case, 96 corresponds with 1,565 pounds per tire. Multiply four times 1,565, and you’d find that the maximum weight of your car is 6,260 pounds.

Buying a Tire With the Right Speed Rating and Load Index

So as noted, the main thing is that you buy a tire with the same speed rating as what’s in your owner’s manual – or a tire that’s even better. So if your speed rating letter is “S,” but you’d like to buy a “T,” go ahead. But if you want to buy an “R,” it’s better to not.

That can sound a little strange. After all, R is 106mph, and you probably never go anywhere near that speed. Why not buy an R?

Because your car manufacturer spent a lot of time and money testing your cars on S tires. That’s what it determined you need. Putting a better tire on your car is perfectly fine but putting a lesser tire than what your car manufacturer recommends — even if it doesn’t seem like a big deal, we can’t in good conscience suggest that.

And when you buy tires, you’ll want to make sure that you don’t ever buy tires with a lower load-carrying capacity than the tires originally installed by your car manufacturer.

You Don’t Have to Think About Any of This — Let the Experts at Tread Connection Think About Tire Speed Ratings and Load Index for You

Now that you know more about tire speed ratings and load indexes, you should be able to make a more informed decision on your next set of tires. But if you’re thinking, “This is clear as mud,” or, “I understand tire speed ratings and load indexes now, but I still don’t want to deal with this,” then no worries.

The TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection will quickly determine all of that information once they show up at your home and office — and then can quickly mount and install your tires and then will be on their way.

And you can forget all about tire speed ratings and the load index for a long, long time.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

What do you think of when you hear the word “backspacing”? We’re not talking about your computer keyboard. We’re talking about your car! Wheel offset and backspacing are important when it comes to measuring how your wheel mounts on your car. They impact the look and feel of your car, as well as its safety.

However, these are also two different numbers measuring very different things. Here’s what drivers need to know about backspacing and wheel offset to ensure they always find the right tires for their vehicle and that they are installed correctly.

What is Wheel Offset and How Do I Measure It?

Your wheel offset is the distance from where you mount your wheel to the wheel’s center. The centerline is the literal “center” of the width of your wheel. This centerline is also known as a 0 mm offset. That’s important to note because your wheel offset is always measured in millimeters.

When you see any offset measurements on your wheels, those are millimeters. Make sure you always have your measurements correct, or the consequences could be catastrophic!

Once you’ve found the centerline, simply take a tape measure and measure between the center and the mounting surface (where the bolts are). Anything over or under this line is called a negative offset or a positive offset. Both of these mean different things and have a different impact on your car and how it drives.

  • If you’re measuring from the center and going toward the outside of the vehicle (the street side), then that’s a positive offset. This is when the wheel and tire are more flush with the outside of the car.
  • If the measurement starts at the center and moves inward toward your brakes and suspension, this is a negative offset. This creates a more convex appearance that dips inward.

But what are negative offsets and positive offsets, and how do they impact your vehicle?

What is a Negative Offset for My Wheels?

A negative offset is when you mount your wheel closer to the mounting hub toward the inside of your vehicle. The negative offset makes wheels stick out more and helps to give that iconic “deep dish” look to bigger wheels.

Wide wheels and tires often require a negative offset to make more space for everything. The negative offset helps it to better fill out the wheel well while also ensuring your wheel and tire don’t get too close to your suspension.

If you’re getting a set of bigger and wider tires like mud tires, then you will likely require a negative offset to account for the added size.

What is a Positive Offset for My Wheels?

By comparison, a positive offset is when the wheel is mounted further away from the centerline (toward the street). When you purchase a new vehicle, there’s a good chance it will have a slightly positive offset.

3-Steps to Measure Wheel Offset

One more time, this is how you measure the wheel offset on your vehicle.

  1. Remove the wheel and accurately measure the width.
  2. Find the centerline of the wheel.
  3. Measure from the centerline to the mounting hub and record it in millimeters.

What is Backspacing, How Do I Measure It, and How Is It Different From Wheel Offset?

Now that you have a better understanding of wheel offset, it’s time to explore your backspacing. Unlike your wheel offset, backspacing is a bit more self-explanatory. It’s the space between the wheel mounting hub and the inside lip (or back) of the wheel.

3 Steps to Measure Backspacing

Measuring your backspacing is similar to your wheel offset with some key differences. Here is how you can measure it on your vehicle.

  1. Attach the wheel to your mounting hub.
  2. Using your tape measure, measure from the mounting hub to the back lip of the wheel.
  3. Record the number in inches.

It’s important to always make sure the backspacing on your wheels is correct. Manufacturers set a maximum requirement so that your wheel doesn’t get too close to your brakes or suspension.

Be sure that whatever new wheels or tires you buy will work with your vehicle. If you’re not sure whether or not your wheels will fit, it may be time to ask the experts!

Trust the Experts at Tread Connection for Offset, Backspacing, and Installation

Now that you know more about wheel offset and backspacing, you should be able to make a more informed decision on your next set of tires. However, you may not want to deal with taking these measurements yourself. With such exact measurements, even being off by a few millimeters can have a profound impact on your vehicle.

The TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection have the knowledge and skills to provide the accurate tire services you need. And thanks to Tread Connection’s convenient and efficient mobile tire service, you can have your tires mounted and installed from the safety and comfort of your home or office.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Jumping into a new business venture can be a risky proposition, even in the best of circumstances. The excitement of going out on your own can often outweigh the negatives, but doing so in a tough economic environment often amplifies the risk, to make the process downright stressful.

The COVID-19 pandemic certainly thrust the country into an economic downturn for a large stretch of 2020 and continues to provide uncertainty heading into 2021. However, there are many businesses across a variety of industries proving that some of the necessary changes brought by the health crisis have actually strengthened their position, offering a blueprint for the best business model to address the current health needs and economic landscape.

Some of these changes require nimble pivoting to survive the crisis in the short term, while others are using this period as a chance to alter their long-term strategies well beyond the pandemic.

Remote Work and Limited Contact

The largest disruption in the usual business environment has been the need for distance. Social distancing hasn’t only been a charge for the public at large but a necessity for businesses, employees, and customers alike since the COVID-19 outbreak in March.

Employees must be provided a safe workplace, if in the workplace at all. Studies show that since the pandemic broke out in earnest, workers across the nation have grown an affinity for working from home — with 72 percent of respondents saying they’d prefer to work remotely, at least two days per week, even after the pandemic.

While not always a positive across the board, the pandemic has highlighted opportunities for remote work that many business owners can offer their employees. Not only does that keep the workforce safe, but also provides a different environment for productivity.

Adjusting Performance Targets and Management

Considering the necessary changes in work settings, it is also important for managers to develop fitting ways to manage performance. Employees and employers have all been forced to adapt, finding a balance in productivity without many of the factors that once allowed for “business as usual” before the pandemic.

Consumer habits have rapidly transformed, both in spending and setting, even quicker than was already taking place pre-pandemic. That has likely altered what was previously considered a success against performance targets. That means it may be more important than ever to pinpoint useful, meaningful KPIs for businesses.

With communication at a premium for even the most successful businesses, those looking to pivot an existing model — and those set on building their own — will have to be more focused on efficient team and project management in a world ruled by distance.

Mobility Meets Consumer Needs

At the same time, consumers have as much need for limiting contact as do employees. Businesses whose viability rests on in-store traffic, such as restaurants or retail, saw a dramatic shift in the behavior of their customers.

While the onset of the pandemic was relatively immediate, the duration of the resulting economic effects remains uncertain. McKinsey & Company’s ongoing research on consumer behaviors shows that nearly two-thirds of Americans are still concerned about doing “normal” out-of-home activities.

The best business model for current circumstances is one that addresses those concerns, providing a service to consumers where they are most likely to engage. Innovation is key.

Restaurants with efficient drive-thru, delivery, or carry-out options have weathered the circumstances better than those without. Small businesses got creative with contactless deliveries. Many other businesses in various industries created new products or found new ways to offer their services.

And even before COVID-19 hit, some were well-positioned to thrive in a new, distant world.

Find the Right Pandemic Positioning with Tread Connection

Business models built on mobility offer a distinct opportunity to succeed through the pandemic and survive economic insecurity. Not only can they reach customers in a comfortable setting and quickly build brand loyalty, but they can offer that same comfort to employees when they go to work.

Tread Connection is a mobile automotive franchise built for the public health and economic uncertainties. Already carrying the advantages of a recession-proof industry such as auto service, it can boast the added benefit of meeting the needs for mobility and distance by offering that service at the customer’s home.

Car troubles don’t magically disappear because of a health crisis. However, providing an option that eliminates the need for visiting a waiting room and limits face-to-face contact gives the consumer an essential service with essential peace-of-mind.

Find out more about Tread Connection franchising opportunities and its positioning as one of the best business models for those motivated to build success in the age of COVID-19.

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