Category: WeatherfordTX-125

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Tire Replacement: 5 Things to Look for When Buying Tires

Avoid costly mistakes when selecting replacement tires for your vehicle. Here are the five most important things to look for when tire shopping.

Every driver who has shopped for tires knows that in many circumstances it can be a frustrating process.

In addition to the complexities of choosing the right tire, a tire replacement always seems to become necessary at the wrong time — whether for your schedule or your budget.

But while the frustration of complexity or timing might cause its share of headaches, shoppers must avoid many of the common mistakes that can prove costly down the line. Unfortunately, those factors often force people into costly decisions more often than they might realize.

If you are currently shopping for a tire replacement or you think the situation is coming up soon, here are a few key factors to consider when buying your new tires.

What kind of tire do you need?

Most newly purchased vehicles in America come off the lot with some form of all-season tires. These are the kind that combine qualities of summer and winter tires so that you can drive safely and comfortably in various road conditions — as long as you don’t hit the extremes of those seasons.

You might, however, be in the market for a specific tire, such as a winter tire or an all-terrain tire. Another factor would be the vehicle on which the tires will be used. While most of the widely available tires will fit on a sedan or SUV, some tires will have different availabilities or perform differently depending on the driving you do in different vehicles. That leads to the next consideration.

What is your driving style?

It helps to envision your expectations for the kind of driving you’ll be doing. Are you simply looking for an everyday tire to get you through your commute to and from work? Do you expect to use the tire for towing or want a sportier, high-performance experience? There are tires that best fit those circumstances. They will not only perform better for the tasks they’re designed to do but will also last longer if used correctly.

What design or tire qualities do you need?

Once you understand the kind of tire and the way you need to drive it, it’s important to find the tire that is best designed to fit the needs that combine those factors. If this is a tire replacement, consider what you liked and didn’t like about the ones being replaced. Were they quiet? Was it a comfortable ride?

It also helps to consider your environment. If you live in a rainy area like Seattle, for example, you might be better suited for a tire that features a tread pattern designed to perform well on slick roads. Of course, you may not know every detail of how rubber compounds and tread design factor into performance or comfort. But knowing what you like and didn’t like, or at least what you need, allows you to ask some better questions of the tire professionals so that they can best assist you.

What’s the warranty?

Ultimately, the goal is to leave with the best, longest-lasting tire that fits your driving and financial situation. It can certainly be tough to predict exactly how long a tire might last, but you can at least gain some insight into that area by understanding the treadwear warranty of tires you are considering.

Not only do they provide a general idea for the life of the tire, but it’s also good to keep in mind in the event you need the warranty. At the end of the day, you may be choosing between very similar tires and may only consider the warranty as the ultimate decision-maker.

As usual, cost.

One of the driving factors in any purchasing decision, the cost of your tire replacement is going to play a major role depending on your circumstances. While everyone wants to get a great deal, know that there is a difference between “cost-effective” and “cheap”. Used tires come with some warning signs to be aware of, and though they offer a short-term budget help, they may result in more frequent tire replacements. That means more money and more headaches.

Similarly, expensive tires aren’t necessarily what you expect. Though they may seem out of your budget, they may actually be worth the money if they get the job done and have the qualities that will give you long-lasting performance.

In the end, it all comes down to what you feel is the best decision based on the information you’ve considered. These situations are often difficult without good help and without the time to do your research. The mobile tire sales and service professionals at Tread Connection can meet you on your schedule to help you through the process.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Aging Tires: 5 Signs it’s Time to Replace Your Tires

We all know old tires are dangerous, but how do you actually know when it’s time to replace them? Here are five signs it’s time to buy new tires.

Tires may seem to have a simple purpose, but everyone drives differently.

Some need adventure in their drive, and some just need to get to work each day. The one true similarity is that aging tires can affect your ability to do the kind of driving you prefer. The older the tires, the less performance you’ll get, the less comfortable you’ll feel, and the less safe you’ll be.

In order to keep you safe and your car running as efficiently and comfortably as possible, here are some of the most important signs to look for in aging tires. Many of them are simple observations that require the occasional check.

Tread Wear

It is no surprise that bald tires pose a significant risk and hamper performance. While you would surely notice your tires being completely bald, it is good to make the switch before things reach that point. To gauge where your tread is at, try the commonly used penny test or quarter test, which we’ve previously broken down when discussing used tires.

If a penny — or a quarter to be even safer — is placed head down in the tread rows and you can still see the president’s head fully, the tire is too worn. That means replacements might be just around the corner.

Cracks or Bulges

These could be the result of a number of issues. For example, tires that aren’t specifically designed for winter can stiffen in cold temperatures. Over time and through several winter seasons, that might result in some cracks in the sidewall. Bulges may also occur when air gets between the lining of the tire and the outer rubber. Though not necessarily an everyday occurrence, this could happen after hitting a curb or a pothole.

Be sure to check the sidewalls of your tires, especially when they are older. You have at least a passing idea of what the tire should look like, and if you notice cracks or bulges, it could signify real issues on the horizon.

Frequent Air Pressure Issues

While having low tire pressure is fairly common, especially in the winter months when temperatures drop, it could be a sign of a puncture or worse if you are frequently noticing the issue. While a puncture could be a simple issue with a relatively easy fix, prolonged driving on an underinflated tire could result in uneven wear. As mentioned above, that can result in a shorter lifespan for the tire.

Discomfort and Vibrations

Not every vibration is created equal. While there are certainly times you may feel a rough ride (on poorly paved roads, for instance), drivers can often feel when something is truly off. That doesn’t necessarily mean it is the tire. There could be an alignment issue or a problem with the suspension. However, major vibrations may be due  to damaged tires. Either way, be sure to have your vehicle and tires checked immediately if you feel such an uncomfortable ride.

General Age of the Tires

For the most part, new tires are expected to last at least three to four years. Of course, all tires are made differently. However, it is a good idea to remind yourself to do regular checks for any issues stated above if you are beyond that mark. Tires generally come with a treadwear warranty, which is often a good indicator of their expected lifespan for miles driven. Knowing when to replace tires can be a tricky call. Overall, though, the key is staying proactive. It is far better to replace aging tires a little too early than run the risk of driving on them for a prolonged period. Rather than driving on questionable tires to get to the auto shop, call the mobile tire professionals at Tread Connection to meet you at your home and help with your decision on replacements.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Taking care of your car is serious business.

As one of the biggest purchases you can make, and the means to getting where you need to go, it pays to keep your car well-maintained.

Though maintenance is a year-round necessity, there is often a heightened focus on preparation when winter rolls around. In many parts of the country, the roads become icy and snow-packed while the temperatures drop. So, many drivers need to make some alterations or check-ups before winter.

But what about when winter ends? Though it doesn’t garner as much attention — thanks to the appearance of things simply returning to normal — it is just as important to get your tires ready for spring as it is for winter.

Temperatures are about to change once again, rainy months will cause the roads to be a different sort of slick, and tires can often be worn from winter use.

Here are five ways you can prepare to exit winter, ensuring your car is as ready for the warmer months as you are!

Take Your Winter Tires Off

While most drivers in the United States opt for all-season tires to avoid this exact task, those who use winter or snow tires should get these changed out once it becomes clear the winter weather is gone for good. They are meant to withstand the cold temperatures and icy and snow-packed roads but not for the warm and wet conditions of spring and summer.

Tires that are specifically designed for the road conditions of a season — whether they are winter or summer tires — are meant to be used strictly in that time of year. Driving on the wrong type of tire will not only make your driving riskier but can also result in quicker wear, costing you in your wallet as well as on the road.

Check for Signs of Wearing

Even for the millions of drivers using all-season tires, exiting the winter season still requires you to get your tires ready for the conditions in spring. Since all-season tires aren’t built specifically for the cold temperatures of winter, they tend to stiffen over time in those conditions. That can cause issues such as cracks or accelerated wearing.

The onset of spring also means many areas across the country will experience rainy conditions and wet roads. That means it’s important to check the tread on your tire to ensure you have the proper amount of traction and grip when things get slick.

Check Air Pressure

One of the easiest ways to get your tires ready for spring is to make sure they are properly inflated, as temperatures fluctuate while the seasons change. It’s common for air pressure to drop with the temperature, meaning you should keep an eye on your tires throughout the winter. However, if you did so and filled them when it was cold, be sure the air pressure does not get too high as the temperatures rise in spring.

Driving on underinflated or overinflated tires can cause a variety of issues, especially wearing unevenly.

Alignment

Nothing marks the end of winter like potholes! Whether hitting one pothole hard or navigating bumpy roads for months, it’s possible your alignment needs a check. If your alignment is off, your tires could be wearing unevenly and causing a rough ride, even on the rare instance of smooth pavement. A problem with your alignment can damage more than your tires, so be sure to get any issues sorted out.

Get Your Tires Rotated

Like many of the checks and inspections above, rotating your tires regularly is a good idea no matter the season. Especially following winter, however, there is an even higher need to ensure your tires avoid uneven wear and tear. Especially considering the factors that can contribute to that wear, like tire pressure issues or prolonged extreme cold, a tire rotation could be key in providing the right traction for spring by changing the position of your tires on the vehicle.

Let the Mobile Tire Professionals Handle The Job

Whether making one or several of these steps — or switching out seasonal tires altogether — to get your tires ready for spring, make the process as simple as possible. Try to stay proactive about the situation. Spending a little time to confirm tires can run smoothly will be a much better feeling than spending money on new tires or car parts because of an issue caused by unexpected wear.

If you don’t enjoy spending time in auto or tire shop waiting rooms, contact the mobile tire service professionals at Tread Connection to visit your home or workplace, getting the job done when and where you need it.

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All-season tires are made to perform in a variety of conditions, including wet roads and light winter driving. Here are our top 10 all-season tire picks.

Like so many aspects of your vehicle, tires are essential to daily life.

Whether commuting to work, taking children to soccer practice, or finally getting away on a vacation road trip, so many everyday routines depend on the performance and reliability of tires.

But despite the importance, that reliability often results in a sort of “out of sight, out of mind” situation. Drivers don’t often consider their tires because they’re constantly doing their job. They get you where you need to be, without much thought – until one day they don’t.

Most drivers are comfortable using the tires that accompany their newly purchased vehicle when they drive off the lot. The first time they consider a need for new tires is often when something eventually happens – a slow leak, a puncture, or maybe balding tires that lead to some frightening handling. That often results in a quick tire shopping process, where drivers are purchasing a product they don’t spend much time considering.

Drivers purchasing tires for everyday use will most likely be pointed in the direction of all-season tires – and for a good reason. But what makes the best all-season tires the perfect option for so many drivers? Let’s dive into the specifics and eventually look at some of the top options you might find.

What Are All-Season Tires?

While it may sound self-explanatory, all-season tires are generally tires that are designed with balance in mind. While other tires are built for extremes in climate or road conditions, like summer and winter tires, all-season tires combine various characteristics to provide quality performance across many conditions.

Summer tires are made to perform when roads are at their driest and temperatures are at their highest. Winter tires are made for the slick and snowy conditions that are common in colder climates. While it’s certainly an option to switch between the two when necessary, most drivers opt for a compromise between the two in all-season tires.

Much like all-terrain tires being a mixture of extreme mud tires and tires for everyday pavement driving, all-season tires are built for a range of conditions and may lose a little performance when faced with extremes. Afterall, it’s no shock that a tire that can perform in high heat might not meet the performance of winter tires in deep snow. Still, all-season tires tend to be perfectly suitable for the majority of usual driving situations.

What Are The Best All-Season Tires Available?

Due to the ever-growing popularity and quality of all-season tires, there is a massive amount of options for you to choose from. While your decision will depend on factors such as your vehicle type, budget, or geography, here are some of the most popular and most highly-rated all-season tires available!

Michelin Defender T+H

One of the most sought-after all-season tires on the market, the Michelin Defender T+H offers impressive performance in various conditions. Already known as one of the best all-season tires for both sedans and vans, its latest update also adds sipes to the tread design, adding increased grip in rain and especially snow. Its 80,000-mile warranty is just the cherry on top.

Michelin Pilot Sport A/S 3+

Another offering from Michelin, the Pilot Sport A/S 3+ is a fantastic option for drivers that want an all-season tire designed for performance. This is designed with sports cars in mind, providing the handling and control those drivers need to maximize the adventure. Expectedly, that performance suffers a bit in snow. That said, this is still a near perfect selection for those looking for a little extra flare.

Pirelli P4 Four Seasons Plus

A brand often associated with high-performance sports and luxury vehicles, Pirelli offered its take on a top-tier all-season tire that offers the handling and responsiveness for the average everyday driver. That performance stays consistent in most road conditions, including impressive braking in wet and snowy pavement.

Pirelli P Zero Nero

While the P4 Four Seasons Plus is made with a wide range of drivers in mind, the P Zero Nero is an all-season tire designed for those who prefer a sportier ride. The tread pattern, shoulder blocks, and sipes, are designed for sports cars, coupes, and small sedans to boldly navigate a variety of road conditions. Though best in warmer and drier conditions, this Pirelli option still provides good performance on wet roads and may be the right fit for certain drivers.

Yokohama Avid Ascend GT

One of the more affordable options on this list, Yokohama’s Avid Ascend GT still provides everything you want in an all-season tire. It performs well in both dry and wet road conditions and does so with little noise and plenty of comfort.

Continental TrueContact Tour

Continental has multiple all-season options, but the TrueContact Tour may be the most impressive. That’s mostly thanks to its performance in wintry weather along with a design meant to improve fuel efficiency in addition to its quiet comfort. The 80,000 mile treadwear warranty is pretty nice, too.

Hankook Ventus ST RH06

Known for producing quality, durable rubbers, Hankook has a variety of all-season tire options. This is one well-suited for larger vehicles like SUVs and light trucks, providing higher load in addition to the same handling and comfort expected of other all-season tires.

Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady

Long known as one of the largest tire brands, it’s no surprise that Goodyear has a few top all-season options. The Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady is one that performs particularly well in snow, ice, and slush common in colder climates. For those expecting extreme weather and unsure about relying on all-season tires, this is about as close as you can get to a winter tire in the all-season category.

BFGoodrich g-Force Comp-2 A/S

One of the best all-season tires for those looking for a sportier, high-performance option, this BFGoodrich product features large tread blocks to enhance its grip on the road. That contact helps with handling on both dry and wet pavement, along with its performance in colder conditions as well.

Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS

A larger-sized alternative, the Bridgestone Dueler H/P Sport AS is a great option for drivers of SUVs, trucks, or crossovers. Especially considering the increased popularity of these vehicles in recent years, it helps to have a tire that performs just as well as the usual all-season options for sedans.

How to Shop for All-Season Tires

Now that you know what to look for in your all-season tires, along with some of the best options on the market, you are ready to begin shopping!

While these are some of the best all-season tires, they are only a small portion of the options at your disposal. Each of these brands have multiple tire products and deciding between those different types of tires can depend on a variety of factors. Your car has certain requirements to perform at its top level, including the tire’s size and load index.

To make your decision and shopping experience, contact the tire professionals at Tread Connection. They can guide you through the shopping process while providing a mobile solution, meeting you at your home or office to make the switch!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

All-terrain tires have an aggressive-looking tread pattern, offering great traction in off-road conditions. Here are the top 15 all-terrain tires on the market.

Who said driving has to be boring?

Between running errands and commuting to work, the day-to-day grind can grow stale for many drivers. Some of them like to get off the highway and into some adventure.

But for those drivers seeking a thrill every now and then, they may still need an option that offers that ability while still maintaining practicality. So instead of searching for the most extreme mud tires on the market, it’s common to opt for all-terrain tires.

What Are the Benefits of All-Terrain Tires?

All-terrain tires offer a tread design and rubber compound that combines many of the best attributes of both touring and mud tires.

Simply put, all-terrain tires could be looked at as the best of both worlds.

Touring tires are perfectly fine for the everyday driver who just needs a safe, secure drive on streets and highways. Off-road enthusiasts likely need mud tires specifically designed for adventurous driving through the muck, but then struggle with comfort and noise issues when they get back to normal driving.

Naturally, there are some compromises when combining the qualities of two extremely different types of tires. However, all-terrain tires are often the perfect option for those who want the ability to off-road without losing comfort on the pavement and don’t want to buy separate tires for either situation.

What Are the Best All-Terrain Tires Out There?

As all-terrain tires have grown in popularity, there is now a wealth of options for drivers who want the attributes they provide. Though they range in price point and range in their capacity to fit a certain driving type or a certain vehicle, here are 15 of the most popular and best-rated all-terrain tires you can find today!

BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 – Less a mud-specific tire than a general off-roading option, the KO2 is built with a tread compound and sidewall design to not only handle mud but also boost durability around sharp edges like rocks. It can also handle wet and snowy conditions on the road.

Michelin LTX A/T 2 – Handling is at a premium with the LTX A/T 2. Both on- and off-road, in summer or winter, this tire is built to provide quality comfort and performance. One drawback may be performance on rocks.

Yokohama Geolandar A/T G015 – One of the most comfortable street rides in this category, the Geolandar G015 impresses in dry and wet conditions. It allows for good off-road adventure, though performance tends to be better in hardpacked conditions rather than deep mud or rocks.

Goodyear Wrangler All-Terrain Adventure with Kevlar – The ideal balance of highway comfort and off-road durability, the All-Terrain Adventure is capable of providing traction in all weather and road conditions at a fairly affordable price.

Falken WildPeak A/T3W – A great option for drivers in colder climates. This tire offers increased stability on wet and snowy roads as well as impressive performance on rough terrain. While that’s all thanks to the tread pattern and sidewalls, those attributes do cause some noise on pavement.

Pirelli Scorpion All Terrain Plus – One of the more expensive options listed here, there is still plenty of value to justify the price point for many drivers. The best attribute is its performance in wet conditions, offering impressive handling on the streets while maintaining the ability to go off-road.

Toyo Open Country A/T II – Emphasizing durability and traction, this tire features a tread design that extends around to the sidewall. That allows for better grip and performance in rough terrain, while the tread pattern still allows for a quiet ride.

Firestone Destination A/T – Combining the durability of mud tires with comfort on the road, this tire boasts a quality rubber compound with a tread design that emphasizes grip in various conditions.

Cooper Discoverer AT3 Tires – Exactly what you imagine an all-terrain tire should be, the Discoverer drives smooth on dry and wet roads while the tread pattern and puncture resistance offers some real adventure when you leave the pavement.

Hankook Dynapro AT-M – Another great value pick that offers impressive grip and traction on wet and snowy roads, though performance in deep mud won’t match some of the more expensive tires on this list.

Kumho Road Venture AT51 – An affordable and serviceable option, the Road Venture AT51 provides a good value due to its performance in various conditions, including snow. A solid low-price alternative to some of the more extreme on this list.

General Grabber AT2 – Another top option for snowy and wet conditions, the AT2 boasts a five-row tread design for increased grip in a variety of conditions, including mud.

Goodyear Wrangler DuraTrac – One of the most popular all-terrain tires, thanks to performance both on and off the road. With a very thick tread pattern, this tire is popular for many pickup drivers; and even comes standard on a few trucks.

Nitto Ridge Grappler – Known for its quality tires for extreme conditions, the Ridge Grappler is Nitto’s top all-terrain option. While maintaining much of the off-road performance thanks to the tread pattern and sidewall design, the Ridge Grappler is still plenty capable for pavement performance.

Bridgestone Dueler A/T 697 – Maybe not one of the newest models on this list, but still an impressive option given its ability on both rough terrain and on the pavement. The tire’s design and tread pattern allows for some real adventure with the quiet comfort you hope for on the roads.

Ready to Buy?

If you’re ready to buy tires that can get you comfortably to your adventure and then provide that adventure once you’re off the pavement, visit your local Tread Connection today! Have the top mobile tire service professionals advise your next all-terrain tires purchase and get you ready for the next thrill.

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