Category: FlowerMoundTX-140

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

You’ve got a lot on your mind, and probably the last thing you typically think about is your tire speed rating. But if you’re in the market for tire services, that’s not a bad thing to know. Even if you’re not looking for new tires any time soon, it’s a good thing to understand what a tire speed rating is.

What Is a Tire Speed Rating And Why Should You Care?

In a nutshell, it’s a rating that indicates the maximum speed that tires can safely maintain over time.

While speed limits can vary across the country (and around the world), the speed rating on a tire has a lot more to do with matching the speed capability of the tire to the top speed capability of the car to which they’re applied. The higher the speed rating, the better control and handling you can expect at higher speeds – basically it’s that the tires can take the heat.

How to Determine What Tire Speed Rating is Right for Your Car

You can find your tire speed rating in your car. Generally, you’ll find it on the driver’s side door jamb or sometimes in the glove box door or on the gas tank hatch, and if you don’t see it there, it’ll definitely be in your vehicle’s owner manual.

Now, you may see the tire speed rating on, say, the driver’s side door jamb and not even realize you’re looking at it. You may see a lot of numbers and letters, like P205/60R15 82S. Don’t worry about all of them. The main thing you’ll want to know is that the “S” signifies the tire speed rating, and the 82 is your load index, which corresponds with how much weight the car can carry.

If it sounds confusing, it is. After all, an “S” isn’t a speed, and 82 pounds sounds like not much weight at all. But if you’re thinking you can only go S miles per hour and carry 82 pounds, as you’ve likely surmised, you’re reading it wrong.

Deciphering the Tire Speed Rating and Load Index

First of all, if you don’t want to decipher the tire speed rating or load index, you don’t have to. If you see that you have an 82S at the end of those numbers and letters, or perhaps a 91V or a 99Y and so on, and you don’t want to bother with thinking too hard about all of this, just make sure that the tires you get are the same as what you’re seeing on the driver’s side door jamb, glove box door, gas tank hatch or vehicle’s owner manual (wherever you found it).

You can call your local Tread Connection franchise, and they’ll be able to help you.

But if you do want to go into the weeds, as you look at 82S or 91V or whatever those last two numbers and letter is, you’ll want to flip through your vehicle owner’s manual and look for two charts.

The S, V, Y, or other letters that you’ll see is your speed rating, and it will correspond with a speed.

What Are the Speed Ratings for Tires?

We’ll give them all to you here, so you don’t have to look it up.

  • L is 75 miles per hour
  • M is 81 miles per hour
  • N is 87 miles per hour
  • P is 93 miles per hour
  • Q is 99 miles per hour
  • R is 106 miles per hour
  • S is 112 miles per hour
  • T is 118 miles per hour
  • U is 124 miles per hour
  • H is 140 miles per hour
  • V is 149 miles per hour
  • Z is over 149 miles per hour
  • W is 168 miles per hour
  • Y is 186 miles per hour

The load index also corresponds with a chart, which you’ll find in your book. These charts are insanely long and heavy on numbers, and so we’ll spare you from wading through it all, but basically if your load index is, say, 96, you’d be able to look for the pounds the car can carry, and in this case, 96 corresponds with 1,565 pounds per tire. Multiply four times 1,565, and you’d find that the maximum weight of your car is 6,260 pounds.

Buying a Tire With the Right Speed Rating and Load Index

So as noted, the main thing is that you buy a tire with the same speed rating as what’s in your owner’s manual – or a tire that’s even better. So if your speed rating letter is “S,” but you’d like to buy a “T,” go ahead. But if you want to buy an “R,” it’s better to not.

That can sound a little strange. After all, R is 106mph, and you probably never go anywhere near that speed. Why not buy an R?

Because your car manufacturer spent a lot of time and money testing your cars on S tires. That’s what it determined you need. Putting a better tire on your car is perfectly fine but putting a lesser tire than what your car manufacturer recommends — even if it doesn’t seem like a big deal, we can’t in good conscience suggest that.

And when you buy tires, you’ll want to make sure that you don’t ever buy tires with a lower load-carrying capacity than the tires originally installed by your car manufacturer.

You Don’t Have to Think About Any of This — Let the Experts at Tread Connection Think About Tire Speed Ratings and Load Index for You

Now that you know more about tire speed ratings and load indexes, you should be able to make a more informed decision on your next set of tires. But if you’re thinking, “This is clear as mud,” or, “I understand tire speed ratings and load indexes now, but I still don’t want to deal with this,” then no worries.

The TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection will quickly determine all of that information once they show up at your home and office — and then can quickly mount and install your tires and then will be on their way.

And you can forget all about tire speed ratings and the load index for a long, long time.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

What do you think of when you hear the word “backspacing”? We’re not talking about your computer keyboard. We’re talking about your car! Wheel offset and backspacing are important when it comes to measuring how your wheel mounts on your car. They impact the look and feel of your car, as well as its safety.

However, these are also two different numbers measuring very different things. Here’s what drivers need to know about backspacing and wheel offset to ensure they always find the right tires for their vehicle and that they are installed correctly.

What is Wheel Offset and How Do I Measure It?

Your wheel offset is the distance from where you mount your wheel to the wheel’s center. The centerline is the literal “center” of the width of your wheel. This centerline is also known as a 0 mm offset. That’s important to note because your wheel offset is always measured in millimeters.

When you see any offset measurements on your wheels, those are millimeters. Make sure you always have your measurements correct, or the consequences could be catastrophic!

Once you’ve found the centerline, simply take a tape measure and measure between the center and the mounting surface (where the bolts are). Anything over or under this line is called a negative offset or a positive offset. Both of these mean different things and have a different impact on your car and how it drives.

  • If you’re measuring from the center and going toward the outside of the vehicle (the street side), then that’s a positive offset. This is when the wheel and tire are more flush with the outside of the car.
  • If the measurement starts at the center and moves inward toward your brakes and suspension, this is a negative offset. This creates a more convex appearance that dips inward.

But what are negative offsets and positive offsets, and how do they impact your vehicle?

What is a Negative Offset for My Wheels?

A negative offset is when you mount your wheel closer to the mounting hub toward the inside of your vehicle. The negative offset makes wheels stick out more and helps to give that iconic “deep dish” look to bigger wheels.

Wide wheels and tires often require a negative offset to make more space for everything. The negative offset helps it to better fill out the wheel well while also ensuring your wheel and tire don’t get too close to your suspension.

If you’re getting a set of bigger and wider tires like mud tires, then you will likely require a negative offset to account for the added size.

What is a Positive Offset for My Wheels?

By comparison, a positive offset is when the wheel is mounted further away from the centerline (toward the street). When you purchase a new vehicle, there’s a good chance it will have a slightly positive offset.

3-Steps to Measure Wheel Offset

One more time, this is how you measure the wheel offset on your vehicle.

  1. Remove the wheel and accurately measure the width.
  2. Find the centerline of the wheel.
  3. Measure from the centerline to the mounting hub and record it in millimeters.

What is Backspacing, How Do I Measure It, and How Is It Different From Wheel Offset?

Now that you have a better understanding of wheel offset, it’s time to explore your backspacing. Unlike your wheel offset, backspacing is a bit more self-explanatory. It’s the space between the wheel mounting hub and the inside lip (or back) of the wheel.

3 Steps to Measure Backspacing

Measuring your backspacing is similar to your wheel offset with some key differences. Here is how you can measure it on your vehicle.

  1. Attach the wheel to your mounting hub.
  2. Using your tape measure, measure from the mounting hub to the back lip of the wheel.
  3. Record the number in inches.

It’s important to always make sure the backspacing on your wheels is correct. Manufacturers set a maximum requirement so that your wheel doesn’t get too close to your brakes or suspension.

Be sure that whatever new wheels or tires you buy will work with your vehicle. If you’re not sure whether or not your wheels will fit, it may be time to ask the experts!

Trust the Experts at Tread Connection for Offset, Backspacing, and Installation

Now that you know more about wheel offset and backspacing, you should be able to make a more informed decision on your next set of tires. However, you may not want to deal with taking these measurements yourself. With such exact measurements, even being off by a few millimeters can have a profound impact on your vehicle.

The TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection have the knowledge and skills to provide the accurate tire services you need. And thanks to Tread Connection’s convenient and efficient mobile tire service, you can have your tires mounted and installed from the safety and comfort of your home or office.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Jumping into a new business venture can be a risky proposition, even in the best of circumstances. The excitement of going out on your own can often outweigh the negatives, but doing so in a tough economic environment often amplifies the risk, to make the process downright stressful.

The COVID-19 pandemic certainly thrust the country into an economic downturn for a large stretch of 2020 and continues to provide uncertainty heading into 2021. However, there are many businesses across a variety of industries proving that some of the necessary changes brought by the health crisis have actually strengthened their position, offering a blueprint for the best business model to address the current health needs and economic landscape.

Some of these changes require nimble pivoting to survive the crisis in the short term, while others are using this period as a chance to alter their long-term strategies well beyond the pandemic.

Remote Work and Limited Contact

The largest disruption in the usual business environment has been the need for distance. Social distancing hasn’t only been a charge for the public at large but a necessity for businesses, employees, and customers alike since the COVID-19 outbreak in March.

Employees must be provided a safe workplace, if in the workplace at all. Studies show that since the pandemic broke out in earnest, workers across the nation have grown an affinity for working from home — with 72 percent of respondents saying they’d prefer to work remotely, at least two days per week, even after the pandemic.

While not always a positive across the board, the pandemic has highlighted opportunities for remote work that many business owners can offer their employees. Not only does that keep the workforce safe, but also provides a different environment for productivity.

Adjusting Performance Targets and Management

Considering the necessary changes in work settings, it is also important for managers to develop fitting ways to manage performance. Employees and employers have all been forced to adapt, finding a balance in productivity without many of the factors that once allowed for “business as usual” before the pandemic.

Consumer habits have rapidly transformed, both in spending and setting, even quicker than was already taking place pre-pandemic. That has likely altered what was previously considered a success against performance targets. That means it may be more important than ever to pinpoint useful, meaningful KPIs for businesses.

With communication at a premium for even the most successful businesses, those looking to pivot an existing model — and those set on building their own — will have to be more focused on efficient team and project management in a world ruled by distance.

Mobility Meets Consumer Needs

At the same time, consumers have as much need for limiting contact as do employees. Businesses whose viability rests on in-store traffic, such as restaurants or retail, saw a dramatic shift in the behavior of their customers.

While the onset of the pandemic was relatively immediate, the duration of the resulting economic effects remains uncertain. McKinsey & Company’s ongoing research on consumer behaviors shows that nearly two-thirds of Americans are still concerned about doing “normal” out-of-home activities.

The best business model for current circumstances is one that addresses those concerns, providing a service to consumers where they are most likely to engage. Innovation is key.

Restaurants with efficient drive-thru, delivery, or carry-out options have weathered the circumstances better than those without. Small businesses got creative with contactless deliveries. Many other businesses in various industries created new products or found new ways to offer their services.

And even before COVID-19 hit, some were well-positioned to thrive in a new, distant world.

Find the Right Pandemic Positioning with Tread Connection

Business models built on mobility offer a distinct opportunity to succeed through the pandemic and survive economic insecurity. Not only can they reach customers in a comfortable setting and quickly build brand loyalty, but they can offer that same comfort to employees when they go to work.

Tread Connection is a mobile automotive franchise built for the public health and economic uncertainties. Already carrying the advantages of a recession-proof industry such as auto service, it can boast the added benefit of meeting the needs for mobility and distance by offering that service at the customer’s home.

Car troubles don’t magically disappear because of a health crisis. However, providing an option that eliminates the need for visiting a waiting room and limits face-to-face contact gives the consumer an essential service with essential peace-of-mind.

Find out more about Tread Connection franchising opportunities and its positioning as one of the best business models for those motivated to build success in the age of COVID-19.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

At Home Tire Installation — No Contact, We Come to You

It doesn’t matter how much or little you drive. Everyone needs a new set of tires eventually. Whether you got a flat tire on the road or your tread is looking worn out, new tires are a purchase we all have to make sooner or later.

Do you want to deal with a waiting room when that time comes? Learn how you can skip the waiting room and get your tires delivered safely and comfortably with at home tire installation.

COVID-19 Makes Customers Rethink Waiting Rooms

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a far-reaching impact on the world around us. Even as some parts of the country begin to reopen, the safety measures instituted by businesses will likely stay in place for a while. For many businesses, that means social distancing, frequent disinfection, and facemasks. Some businesses have even converted parking lots into waiting rooms.

These procedures, while important for public health, take what is already a frustrating or inconvenient experience and add a new level of stress. How can customers be sure the waiting rooms are clean? It may be easy to trust a business to follow the rules, but people cannot control the actions of other customers.

Even with the extra precautions, it’s understandable that many people would prefer to avoid going out and risking a waiting room. Thankfully, mobile services like at home tire-installation are changing the game. Now, people can get the services they need from the comfort of their own homes without the risk of exposure in a crowded tire shop.

Schedule Essential Services from the Comfort of Your Couch

Businesses and essential services are finding new and ingenious ways to reach customers during even the most difficult of times. Dine-in restaurants offer meal-prep kits customers can make at home. Doctors are offering virtual visits through tele-health services. Meanwhile, one company is disrupting the entire retail tire industry by forgoing brick-and-mortar locations altogether.

At home tire installation with Tread Connection is changing the way customers think about buying tires both during coronavirus and in the future. Mobile tire services offer zero-contact installation performed at your home or office. This provides a much-needed option for consumers that is not only safer but also more convenient.

It’s all as easy as scheduling your next tire service online. From there, a TIA-certified technician will arrive at your location to take care of your requested service. And mobile tire services offer more than at home tire installation. Customers can choose from a range of services, including flat repair, tire balancing, TPMS sensor replacement, and more.

Find the Tires You Need and Avoid the Waiting Room

There’s no need to put yourself or your family at unnecessary risk for a set of tires. There’s also no reason to spend your precious time in a stuffy, and potentially unsafe, tire shop waiting room. With at home tire installation, you can bring the tire shop to you.

Learn how you can find great value on the most popular tires and brands without ever leaving your couch. Find a Tread Connection van near you, and schedule your next service at a time and place that works for you and your family.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

I just had a tire blow out and I want to know what I should do right now so that I don’t cause any damage to my vehicle. Walk me through the first steps I should take–from carefully getting to safety to getting the tire repaired or replaced.

It’s a motorist’s worst nightmare. You’re cruising down the highway when suddenly you hear a loud bang! The next thing you know, there is a loud flapping coming from underneath your car. You have a blown out tire.

If you don’t know what to do in this situation, it could spell disaster for you, your passengers, and other drivers. A report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) shows there were 738 fatalities from tire-related crashes in 2017.

Do you know what to do if you get a blown out tire on the highway? It’s important for every driver to know how to respond to protect their safety and the safety of the other drivers. Here’s what you need to know

Don’t Panic!

Hearing your tire blow can be a shocking and frightening ordeal. The most important thing to remember is to stay calm and not to panic. Your car may jerk to one side or push you toward the side where your tire blew. Do not pull the wheel to one side or the other.

Attempting to overcorrect your steering can cause the car to lose control. Maintain your composure, keep both hands on the wheel, and keep your car moving straight.

Don’t Hit the Brakes!

Your first instinct when you experience a blown tire may be to slam on the brake pedal. This is exactly what you should NOT do. Trying to brake suddenly during a blowout can cause your wheels to lock up, resulting in loss of control of your vehicle. Your car could fishtail or spin out and hit other vehicles.

Instead of hitting the brakes, the best thing you can do is try your best to maintain your speed. Slowly take your foot off the gas and allow your car to decelerate naturally.

Keep both hands on the wheel at the 10 o’clock and 2 o’clock positions and keep your vehicle straight as you slow down. After your speed drops to a safe level below 30 mph, you can start to apply the brakes slowly.

Pull Over as Safely as Possible

Once your vehicle has decelerated to a safe speed, you can slowly pull your vehicle over to the side of the road. Make sure you are far enough on the shoulder to provide ample space between you and oncoming traffic so that you and your passengers are safe.

When your car has safely stopped, and you’re out of harm’s way, you can finally take a deep breath. Now that you’re on the side of the road, you should turn on your vehicle’s hazard lights. This signals other drivers that something is wrong and that they should take caution around your car.

Before you open the door, look carefully for oncoming traffic. When the coast is clear, it’s time to step out and survey the damage.

Turn on Your Hazard Lights and Survey the Damage

The next thing you need to do is see how bad the damage is to your tire. If it turns out your tire has low pressure, then you may be able to repair your flat tire. However, if you’ve suffered a blowout, then the damage will be obvious.

A blowout is much more severe than accidentally driving on a flat tire. If your tire has blown, then you may run the risk of having damaged your wheel also. Do not try to drive your vehicle once your tire has blown. Your best option is always to install your spare or wait for help to arrive.

Install Your Spare

When you remove your blown out tire, it’s going to look like a mess. Rubber will be ripped and torn, and there may be cables or wire sticking out from where the tire failed. Your tire is still attached to your wheel, which you’re going to need when you replace the blown tire.

Remove your spare tire from your vehicle. It’s often located in a compartment on the bottom of your trunk or affixed to the back or underside of your car. Then carefully remove the blown tire and store it in the trunk of your vehicle. The next step is installing your spare tire and getting your care to a safer location where you can get a more permanent fix.

Get Your Car to a Safe Space

If you have a blown out tire on the road, then getting your car to a safe location should be your top priority. Look for a place like a nearby business or parking lot. This will help to get you and your vehicle away from dangerous traffic and give you the opportunity to make repairs.

Contact Tread Connection

Don’t panic if you’ve become the victim of a blown out tire. Contact the certified tire experts at Tread Connection for flat tire repair and buy new tires on a schedule that works for you.

Just make sure your vehicle is in a safe and secure location where our van has plenty of room to work. Our certified tire experts will take care of the rest.

You can always trust Tread Connection to get you back on the road, on your schedule. Find a Tread Connection van in your area and learn how we can take care of your blown tire today!

 

 

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