Category: WeatherfordTX-125

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Every driver is different. So is every drive.

Luckily, there is a tire to fit nearly any need on or off the road. From the everyday all-season options to the most aggressive mud tires that off-road enthusiasts prefer, specific tires are available to fit specific situations. That is especially the case for drivers who want the ability to drive on everyday roads while getting the most performance out of their vehicle.

Street tires offer the ability to perform the best of both worlds, from those everyday commuters to those looking for a high-performance option for their sportier rides. Whichever way you want to drive, it is important to have confidence in a tire’s ability to grip the road and respond to your preferred style of driving.

So what allows street tires to fill so many different roles? Let’s take a look at some of the characteristics and what you should look for in a reliable, affordable tire.

Handling

Though some more adventurous drivers opt for more extreme tires such as all-terrain or off-road alternatives, manufacturers have pavement in mind when rolling out street tires. These options are the best on the market for drivers who want confidence that their tires will have responsive handling when they maneuver around corners and safely navigate in and out of traffic, as well as the ability to brake quickly when necessary. Every driver wants tires that can respond to your desired actions when gripping the steering wheel.

All-Season Reliability

One of the hallmarks of quality street tires is reliable performance in road conditions of all kinds. The best all-season tires are the options that keep their traction and performance in various situations. Whether the road is dry or wet, or if the temperatures are hot or cold or snowy, you should have confidence that the tire will still get you from Point A to Point B safely and comfortably. Still, many drivers want more out of their street tires than simple practicality.

High Performance

For drivers of sportier and luxury vehicles, high-performance street tires are a popular choice. Sometimes, an everyday all-season touring tire is not enough. After all, you chose that vehicle for a reason, and you want to get the most out of the driving experience. Many of these tires offer the same handling and all-season grip as an all-season tire but with the added benefit of allowing drivers to have confidence at higher speeds and situations that would put more strain on everyday tires.

Signs of Great Street Tires

Those characteristics and abilities of various street tires are made possible because of the specific designs that you should look for when shopping for a new set. First, most all-season tires have sipes that help eject water and snow from the tires, providing better grip in wet conditions. Many of them, especially tires cited as high performance, are designed with an asymmetric tread pattern that boosts the handling abilities by improving traction between the tire and the pavement. A number of street tires are also built with sturdy but flexible rubber and tread compounds that won’t stiffen and lose grip in the cold and won’t wear too quickly at high speeds.

Cost

Everyone wants a great deal, but drivers who are looking for tires enter the purchasing process with a variety of budgets. The good news is that there is a tire that can fit almost any cost barrier. Several quality all-season touring options can be found at or around $100 for the everyday driver — sometimes a little less. For those looking for a higher performance option, they can expect higher costs. Still, while some premium tires could get as expensive as $300 or more, there are plenty of quality products available at lower price points. You don’t have to break the bank to have confidence in your tires, and you don’t have to break the bank to have some adventure either!

Let the Pros Help

Of course, the average driver shopping for new street tires might not be able to decipher the difference between similar products, aside from any cost differences. However, there are professionals who are willing and available to guide you through the shopping process. They can determine which tires best fit your driving habits, and which would actually fit on your vehicle in the first place!

Tread Connection, the mobile tire service experts, can not only guide you through your decision but can help you make the replacement at a time and place of your choosing!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Tire Load Rating: How To Easily Determine Load Capacity

Tires must be able to support the vehicle’s weight, which is why it’s crucial that you pay attention to load rating. Here’s how to calculate your load rating.

Imagine yourself preparing to enter a tire shop, needing to buy a brand-new set of tires.

Whether you are thrust into the process because of an emergency like a blowout, or it is just time to upgrade from your set of aging tires, it is often a complex process.

That’s because there are so many ways drivers evaluate their tires when in the shopping process. The most common include seasonal options such as the choice between winter tires or all-season tires. There are also factors such as the amount of fun you want — which may lead you to mud tires or all-terrain tires. In most circumstances, those are the general areas.

But beyond the decision of what kind of tire you need for the kind of driving you want to do, there are some more in-depth details that the average driver may not consider. One of these factors is the tire load rating, a concept that is often overlooked in the tire shopping process but can impact both your tires and your vehicle’s capacity overall.

What Is A Tire Load Rating?

At its most basic level, a tire load rating specifies the tire’s maximum amount of load-carrying capacity. It determines how much weight, or “max load”, the vehicle can carry when those tires are at the correct pressure.

Tires are constructed with specific uses in mind. Much like mud tires featuring a distinct tread design and extremely durable rubber compounds, some tires are made to carry a certain amount of weight depending on the style of tire.

But how do you discover what the load rating is for any specific tire?

If you look at the sidewall of a tire, you’ll notice several numbers, letters, and symbols. They may not mean anything to the average driver, but those details lay out the tire’s specifications. Reading a tire’s sidewall can help you determine whether the tires have the right size, speed rating, and load rating for your vehicle. Tire sidewalls often have what is called a tire load index, which is another way of determining the amount of weight the tire could safely carry.

How Do I Put Those Numbers To Use?

When buying tires, it’s important to account for the size of your vehicle and how you plan to use it. Some smaller vehicles may not need a very high load rating. Larger vehicles such as trucks or SUVs, however, demand tires that have the capacity to hold not only the weight of the vehicle but everything they might be tasked with carrying.

Remember to also factor in that additional weight when shopping for tires. The max load might cover the weight of your truck, for example, but not the lumber you plan to haul every so often. It’s better to plan to have plenty of buffer between your tire load rating and its usual use.

Let The Pros Guide You

If you’re shopping for tires alone, it’s important to include all of these factors — including the load index and other specifications — into your consideration. Tire sidewalls can tell you what a tire offers, but you should also learn what your vehicle needs. Much of that information can be found in the vehicle’s operating manual. Another possible strategy to use is that if you bought a car new, it’s likely safe to assume the tires that came with it have the proper load index, so opt for tires that have that rating or higher in the next set you put on your vehicle.

Of course, you don’t always have to shop alone.

There are plenty of tire professionals in your area who can guide you through the process and simplify the variety of considerations – all through a stress-free conversation. If you feel like you may need help navigating the process, contact Tread Connection for tire services that come to you, ensuring you combine the peace of mind with the convenience of mobile tire shopping experience brought to your home or workplace.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Tire Replacement: 5 Things to Look for When Buying Tires

Avoid costly mistakes when selecting replacement tires for your vehicle. Here are the five most important things to look for when tire shopping.

Every driver who has shopped for tires knows that in many circumstances it can be a frustrating process.

In addition to the complexities of choosing the right tire, a tire replacement always seems to become necessary at the wrong time — whether for your schedule or your budget.

But while the frustration of complexity or timing might cause its share of headaches, shoppers must avoid many of the common mistakes that can prove costly down the line. Unfortunately, those factors often force people into costly decisions more often than they might realize.

If you are currently shopping for a tire replacement or you think the situation is coming up soon, here are a few key factors to consider when buying your new tires.

What kind of tire do you need?

Most newly purchased vehicles in America come off the lot with some form of all-season tires. These are the kind that combine qualities of summer and winter tires so that you can drive safely and comfortably in various road conditions — as long as you don’t hit the extremes of those seasons.

You might, however, be in the market for a specific tire, such as a winter tire or an all-terrain tire. Another factor would be the vehicle on which the tires will be used. While most of the widely available tires will fit on a sedan or SUV, some tires will have different availabilities or perform differently depending on the driving you do in different vehicles. That leads to the next consideration.

What is your driving style?

It helps to envision your expectations for the kind of driving you’ll be doing. Are you simply looking for an everyday tire to get you through your commute to and from work? Do you expect to use the tire for towing or want a sportier, high-performance experience? There are tires that best fit those circumstances. They will not only perform better for the tasks they’re designed to do but will also last longer if used correctly.

What design or tire qualities do you need?

Once you understand the kind of tire and the way you need to drive it, it’s important to find the tire that is best designed to fit the needs that combine those factors. If this is a tire replacement, consider what you liked and didn’t like about the ones being replaced. Were they quiet? Was it a comfortable ride?

It also helps to consider your environment. If you live in a rainy area like Seattle, for example, you might be better suited for a tire that features a tread pattern designed to perform well on slick roads. Of course, you may not know every detail of how rubber compounds and tread design factor into performance or comfort. But knowing what you like and didn’t like, or at least what you need, allows you to ask some better questions of the tire professionals so that they can best assist you.

What’s the warranty?

Ultimately, the goal is to leave with the best, longest-lasting tire that fits your driving and financial situation. It can certainly be tough to predict exactly how long a tire might last, but you can at least gain some insight into that area by understanding the treadwear warranty of tires you are considering.

Not only do they provide a general idea for the life of the tire, but it’s also good to keep in mind in the event you need the warranty. At the end of the day, you may be choosing between very similar tires and may only consider the warranty as the ultimate decision-maker.

As usual, cost.

One of the driving factors in any purchasing decision, the cost of your tire replacement is going to play a major role depending on your circumstances. While everyone wants to get a great deal, know that there is a difference between “cost-effective” and “cheap”. Used tires come with some warning signs to be aware of, and though they offer a short-term budget help, they may result in more frequent tire replacements. That means more money and more headaches.

Similarly, expensive tires aren’t necessarily what you expect. Though they may seem out of your budget, they may actually be worth the money if they get the job done and have the qualities that will give you long-lasting performance.

In the end, it all comes down to what you feel is the best decision based on the information you’ve considered. These situations are often difficult without good help and without the time to do your research. The mobile tire sales and service professionals at Tread Connection can meet you on your schedule to help you through the process.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Aging Tires: 5 Signs it’s Time to Replace Your Tires

We all know old tires are dangerous, but how do you actually know when it’s time to replace them? Here are five signs it’s time to buy new tires.

Tires may seem to have a simple purpose, but everyone drives differently.

Some need adventure in their drive, and some just need to get to work each day. The one true similarity is that aging tires can affect your ability to do the kind of driving you prefer. The older the tires, the less performance you’ll get, the less comfortable you’ll feel, and the less safe you’ll be.

In order to keep you safe and your car running as efficiently and comfortably as possible, here are some of the most important signs to look for in aging tires. Many of them are simple observations that require the occasional check.

Tread Wear

It is no surprise that bald tires pose a significant risk and hamper performance. While you would surely notice your tires being completely bald, it is good to make the switch before things reach that point. To gauge where your tread is at, try the commonly used penny test or quarter test, which we’ve previously broken down when discussing used tires.

If a penny — or a quarter to be even safer — is placed head down in the tread rows and you can still see the president’s head fully, the tire is too worn. That means replacements might be just around the corner.

Cracks or Bulges

These could be the result of a number of issues. For example, tires that aren’t specifically designed for winter can stiffen in cold temperatures. Over time and through several winter seasons, that might result in some cracks in the sidewall. Bulges may also occur when air gets between the lining of the tire and the outer rubber. Though not necessarily an everyday occurrence, this could happen after hitting a curb or a pothole.

Be sure to check the sidewalls of your tires, especially when they are older. You have at least a passing idea of what the tire should look like, and if you notice cracks or bulges, it could signify real issues on the horizon.

Frequent Air Pressure Issues

While having low tire pressure is fairly common, especially in the winter months when temperatures drop, it could be a sign of a puncture or worse if you are frequently noticing the issue. While a puncture could be a simple issue with a relatively easy fix, prolonged driving on an underinflated tire could result in uneven wear. As mentioned above, that can result in a shorter lifespan for the tire.

Discomfort and Vibrations

Not every vibration is created equal. While there are certainly times you may feel a rough ride (on poorly paved roads, for instance), drivers can often feel when something is truly off. That doesn’t necessarily mean it is the tire. There could be an alignment issue or a problem with the suspension. However, major vibrations may be due  to damaged tires. Either way, be sure to have your vehicle and tires checked immediately if you feel such an uncomfortable ride.

General Age of the Tires

For the most part, new tires are expected to last at least three to four years. Of course, all tires are made differently. However, it is a good idea to remind yourself to do regular checks for any issues stated above if you are beyond that mark. Tires generally come with a treadwear warranty, which is often a good indicator of their expected lifespan for miles driven. Knowing when to replace tires can be a tricky call. Overall, though, the key is staying proactive. It is far better to replace aging tires a little too early than run the risk of driving on them for a prolonged period. Rather than driving on questionable tires to get to the auto shop, call the mobile tire professionals at Tread Connection to meet you at your home and help with your decision on replacements.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Taking care of your car is serious business.

As one of the biggest purchases you can make, and the means to getting where you need to go, it pays to keep your car well-maintained.

Though maintenance is a year-round necessity, there is often a heightened focus on preparation when winter rolls around. In many parts of the country, the roads become icy and snow-packed while the temperatures drop. So, many drivers need to make some alterations or check-ups before winter.

But what about when winter ends? Though it doesn’t garner as much attention — thanks to the appearance of things simply returning to normal — it is just as important to get your tires ready for spring as it is for winter.

Temperatures are about to change once again, rainy months will cause the roads to be a different sort of slick, and tires can often be worn from winter use.

Here are five ways you can prepare to exit winter, ensuring your car is as ready for the warmer months as you are!

Take Your Winter Tires Off

While most drivers in the United States opt for all-season tires to avoid this exact task, those who use winter or snow tires should get these changed out once it becomes clear the winter weather is gone for good. They are meant to withstand the cold temperatures and icy and snow-packed roads but not for the warm and wet conditions of spring and summer.

Tires that are specifically designed for the road conditions of a season — whether they are winter or summer tires — are meant to be used strictly in that time of year. Driving on the wrong type of tire will not only make your driving riskier but can also result in quicker wear, costing you in your wallet as well as on the road.

Check for Signs of Wearing

Even for the millions of drivers using all-season tires, exiting the winter season still requires you to get your tires ready for the conditions in spring. Since all-season tires aren’t built specifically for the cold temperatures of winter, they tend to stiffen over time in those conditions. That can cause issues such as cracks or accelerated wearing.

The onset of spring also means many areas across the country will experience rainy conditions and wet roads. That means it’s important to check the tread on your tire to ensure you have the proper amount of traction and grip when things get slick.

Check Air Pressure

One of the easiest ways to get your tires ready for spring is to make sure they are properly inflated, as temperatures fluctuate while the seasons change. It’s common for air pressure to drop with the temperature, meaning you should keep an eye on your tires throughout the winter. However, if you did so and filled them when it was cold, be sure the air pressure does not get too high as the temperatures rise in spring.

Driving on underinflated or overinflated tires can cause a variety of issues, especially wearing unevenly.

Alignment

Nothing marks the end of winter like potholes! Whether hitting one pothole hard or navigating bumpy roads for months, it’s possible your alignment needs a check. If your alignment is off, your tires could be wearing unevenly and causing a rough ride, even on the rare instance of smooth pavement. A problem with your alignment can damage more than your tires, so be sure to get any issues sorted out.

Get Your Tires Rotated

Like many of the checks and inspections above, rotating your tires regularly is a good idea no matter the season. Especially following winter, however, there is an even higher need to ensure your tires avoid uneven wear and tear. Especially considering the factors that can contribute to that wear, like tire pressure issues or prolonged extreme cold, a tire rotation could be key in providing the right traction for spring by changing the position of your tires on the vehicle.

Let the Mobile Tire Professionals Handle The Job

Whether making one or several of these steps — or switching out seasonal tires altogether — to get your tires ready for spring, make the process as simple as possible. Try to stay proactive about the situation. Spending a little time to confirm tires can run smoothly will be a much better feeling than spending money on new tires or car parts because of an issue caused by unexpected wear.

If you don’t enjoy spending time in auto or tire shop waiting rooms, contact the mobile tire service professionals at Tread Connection to visit your home or workplace, getting the job done when and where you need it.

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