Category: GastoniaNC-111

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Shopping for tires can be tough, with multiple options available that fit your vehicle. We break down each type so you can find the right tire for your needs.

Tires are an essential part of getting from Point A to Point B. They are also one of the most visible features on our vehicle. We see them every day, unlike most of the intricate inner workings of our vehicles.

And yet, for many drivers, shopping for tires is just as confusing and frustrating a process as dealing with any other automotive issue. For that reason, we often settle for the tires that come on our vehicle at the time of purchase, figuring our job is done. We don’t think about them again until we’re forced to, but by then, the stress of timing and necessity can compound the frustration.

From sizes to brands to the sheer variety of different types of tires, tire shopping can be overwhelming. So let’s break down the key areas of focus when making your decision on new tires.

What Fits Your Vehicle – We’re Talking More Than Just Size

Every car has certain specifications for each of its parts, and the tires are no different.

Of course, the size of a tire is one consideration. They need to fit on the wheels of the vehicle, getting their job done without interfering with any other functions.

Finding tires that fit on your vehicle is an obvious step to the shopping process. Going further, however, finding tires that are fit for your vehicle also matters.

Depending on how closely you’ve inspected your tires, you may have noticed numbers and letters on the sidewall. These markings aren’t simply model numbers. They actually tell you a lot about what a tire is designed to do, and yes, how they’ll affect your use.

Most people do not know how to read these sidewall designations, but they are essential to finding the different types of tires that would fit your vehicle. They can tell you information such as the size, how much weight your car can handle with them, and how fast you can drive on them for an extended time without issues.

Professionals would likely be able to decipher these designations to ensure you have the right tires for your vehicle. But for those shopping themselves or online, it is crucial to understand this information.

What Kind of Driving?

When it comes to purchasing tires, one of the most important considerations are the different types of tires that are available. Beyond the specifications like size or speed rating, drivers have options based on the kind of driving they envision.

Most vehicles come with some form of all-season tires at the time of purchase. This is usually a perfectly fine option for most drivers, because all-season tires are made to perform reliably in different types of weather or road conditions.

However, some drivers live in climates that bring the expectation of extreme weather.

In these cases, they may switch between different types of tires to adapt to those conditions. Drivers in Arizona may opt for summer or all-season tires because they rarely experience the cold and snow that a driver in Minnesota can expect each year. That driver may switch to winter tires in the colder months to handle any extreme conditions.

Of course, there are other considerations for drivers of another stripe. Off-roading and mud tires are there to help the most adventurous among us to enjoy their thrills at maximum performance and safety.

It all comes down to what sort of driving you envision, and what tires will best get that job done.

How to Shop

When shopping for tires — or any automotive need, for that matter — customers often rely on the simple factor of cost.

Pricing obviously matters. However, settling for the wrong tire even at the right price point can prove to be costly down the road. Keeping all the above factors in mind can not only save you money but also bring you peace of mind. At the end of the day, you need to find tires that both fit your budget and ensure your car can safely perform at its highest potential.

It’s not always easy for the average driver to know how to thread that needle. In addition to offering mobile tire services for those needing an upgrade or simply a replacement, tire professionals at Tread Connection can help you better understand the process and get you back on the road with confidence.

There are other factors, such as treadwear warranties. It also simply comes down to comfort. You could be just as happy finding an exact replacement.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

It’s no longer necessary to run a business from an office. Explore the options best for you.

The past year — particularly considering the COVID-19 outbreak — certainly put things into perspective for all aspects of our society. From who we see, where we shop, and how we work, life was so drastically different that it forced some reconsideration of what we think of as normal.

That reconsideration was essential for businesses grappling with the need to meet a brand new set of consumer demands and behaviors.

This was most evident in the struggles experienced by brick and mortar businesses in a variety of industries. The indefinite need for distance and limited interpersonal contact made restaurants, auto shops, and small businesses around the country question both their short- and long-term viability.

As business owners pivot several aspects of their business models, one of the questions going forward is whether to stay with brick and mortar locations or to join the growing trend of mobile business models.

The Trouble With Brick and Mortar

Whether creating a new business plan or altering an existing one, there are benefits and drawbacks to every decision. Beyond the many considerations brick and mortar plans require, the biggest for most prospective business owners is simple — cost.

From initial startup costs to long term factors — such as labor, rent, taxes, and utilities — there is a substantial bottom line that competes with the troubling trend of consumer behaviors. Even before the pandemic, brick and mortar locations saw dwindling foot traffic as the online marketplace continued to gain traction. Because it’s nearly impossible to run a business without an online presence, that means business owners must now balance both the physical location along with one on the web.

There are certainly strategies that creative business owners have introduced to withstand the hurdles that have been put in front of brick and mortar businesses recently. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has put that often-limited success in a further bind.

Building a Mobile Business Model

While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to beating the online trends, it has become essential to find alternatives to brick and mortar models. Pivoting to a mobile business model has served as a valuable option for many businesses.

Particularly during the pandemic, offering products and services without forcing employees or customers into uncomfortable proximity has proven to be an effective model.

However, there is a wealth of positivity surrounding mobile business models even when things return to normalcy. In addition to questions about which consumer behaviors will stick around, operating a mobile business remains a viable alternative for business owners wary of operating brick and mortar locations.

Mobile business models can be built to meet consumers where they are, along with the benefit of low startup and overhead costs and often reduced staffing needs. Depending on the business, that is often a recipe towards finding a beneficial profit margin to all but guarantee long term success.

These mobile options could manifest in something as small as a kiosk that allows a restaurant or small retail business to offer their limited inventory in high-traffic spaces as they get off the ground. They could be food trucks or re-purposed trailers for retail spaces.

These qualities also benefit franchise businesses like Tread Connection that embrace mobility. The reduced costs associated with many mobile businesses could also open doors for a wider pool of possible franchisees. That allows more hopeful entrepreneurs to jump at the opportunity to fuel the business’s growth and join in its success.

Which Is the Best Option For You?

As with every part of building a business plan, this decision should be made after performing in-depth market research. As part of that process, ask yourself the following questions:

  • Depending on the service being provided, how necessary is a brick and mortar location?
  • Would consumers appreciate or even prefer a mobile option?
  • How would a mobile business model change the business’s capacity to meet its demand and build a sustainable profit margin?

Along with the rest of your research, finding answers to these questions could set you on a path towards deciding on a mobile business model with confidence.

COVID-19 has changed the business landscape for both the short and long run, meaning the changes brick and mortar business models have experienced in recent years have simply been accelerated. It’s better to be on the front end of change rather than lagging behind.

Contact Tread Connection today to discuss the possibilities of owning your own mobile franchise!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

If you already have all-season tires, you may think you don’t need winter tires for the snow and ice. Here’s how the two differ and what you should consider in the winter.

Few purchases matter more than ones made on your vehicle. No matter the age, make, or model, it has to get you from Point A to Point B safely every day. Unfortunately, many drivers lack detailed knowledge about how to properly care for their vehicles. Without seeing a dashboard indicator or feeling something unusual, smaller problems can accumulate without knowing what to look for.

And even if we feel tires are fairly straightforward — especially compared to the intricacies of an engine or transmission — there are plenty of factors that can limit performance. After all, your tires are your connection to the road, meaning the spectrum of conditions drivers encounter make tires an essential consideration.

Unfortunately, many Americans are unaware of the options at their disposal when it comes to tires, settling for whatever was on the vehicle when they bought it. But making specific tire purchases — based on something as simple as the seasons — can have a noticeable impact on both safety and comfort.

Let’s consider the differences between winter tires with all-season options and break down whether buying specific snow tires are worth the money.

Winter Tires vs. All-Season Tires

Much as they sound, the difference between winter tires and all-season tires comes down to the season in which they can best help performance and safety.

Winter tires are designed specifically for the elements associated with winter weather — snow, ice, slush, and cold road temperatures. Similarly, summer tires are designed for hotter temperatures.

The most distinct attributes winter tires offer include deep grooves — called “sipes” — and specialized tread patterns to provide more traction on snow-covered roads. Other tires can become stiff as temperatures drop. But snow tires are also made of softer, more flexible rubber material to maintain performance in colder temperatures.

All-season tires, which often come with a newly-bought car, are essentially a combination of the attributes boasted by winter and summer tires. Along with the sipes on the inner tire for snow and slush, it offers the outside tread commonly found in summer tires. They are made to handle both dry and wet conditions and any temperature outside of the extreme. In many circumstances, it’s the best of both worlds.

So which tires should you choose? That mostly comes down to personal preference, though geography could certainly simplify the decision.

All-season tires are common for a reason — they get the job done in most climates and at most times. But for drivers in colder climates such as New England or the Upper Midwest, changing out to winter tires may be a necessary investment to withstand extreme conditions or prolonged periods of freezing temperatures and snowy roads.

Do I Have To Get New Wheels to Use Winter Tires?

Not necessarily, but it could be the preferred option for some drivers.

Swapping out your wheels for the winter could protect your usual wheels from the elements, especially if they are extreme enough for you to consider new tires in the first place. However, making that decision means accepting a few trade-offs.

Of course, cost would be a factor. Purchasing new wheels along with winter tires could be a sizeable initial cost. If you aren’t comfortable changing out wheels yourself, plan to spend some money each winter to get them changed at a tire or auto shop. You’ll also need space to store whichever tires aren’t in use in a given season.

Lastly, consider the size of the wheels and tires you are purchasing. Most vehicles can accommodate at least a few wheel sizes. Be sure to do your research to ensure the tire and wheel sizes not only match but are also the best option for your needs.

What Are The Best Winter Tire Options?

If opting to swap out your tires in the winter, there are several good options. Many of the largest tire brands offer winter tires.

Some of the most popular include Pirelli’s Winter Sottozero 3, Bridgestone’s Blizzak WS80 or the newer WS90, and the Michelin X-Ice Xi3. Winter tires can vary in price depending on several factors, but it’s always worth spending some time to talk with the person selling them about their insights about what’s best for your car and the season.

If needing a convenient option to find tires and tire services near you, be sure to ask about the options available in your area.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

If you’re thinking of buying a car franchise (that is, some franchise related to cars), we have some advice. And before we offer our advice, we’ll address the elephant in the room. No need to be cagey. We think buying a Tread Connection franchise is a smart strategy. That is, if you’re thinking of buying a franchise — and you want your franchise to involve helping motorists.

 If you’re looking for a car franchise, we hope you’ll contact Tread Connection to discuss franchising opportunities.

Cars are getting more sophisticated.

We don’t need to tell you that, but what this means for you is that if you’re thinking of buying a car-related franchise that fixes cars, that’s getting harder and harder to do. As cars end up having more sophisticated technology, many independent garages — and even national chains — are finding that they don’t have access to mechanical and electronic repair data that they need to do work on customers’ cars.

In other words, more and more, when a motorist wants to do something more complicated than an oil change or getting their tires put on, they’re going to the dealer. That may be a future problem for some car-related franchises that focus on engine repair.

Now, that may change eventually, and we hope it does. Voters in Massachusetts recently passed a measure forcing automakers to offer better access to the data that independent garages need. Still, that’s the nice thing about the tire business. Tread Connection (and, yes, other tire franchises) can stay out of the dealers versus car mechanics fight.

Cars are getting heavier.

Consumer desire for more space, luxury, and power from their vehicles have grown the literal size of vehicles, making them larger and heavier, and with heavier cars come larger tires that need to be replaced more often. While the sophistication of cars is changing the approach of many mechanics, cars’ external needs continue to be high demand, be it decaling, tire and wheel maintenance, or even detailing.

Car repair is almost recession- and pandemic-proof.

Obviously, when the economy is hammered and thrown into the blender, the way it has been in 2020, every business is hurt. Well, if you make masks and hand sanitizer, currently, you’re sitting pretty. But essentially, yes, every business is going to be banged up.

But people can’t put off getting tires forever, and they don’t and won’t, and market trends back that up. According to Allied Market Research, the global automotive tire market was valued at $112 billion in 2019 and is projected to hit $154.40 billion by 2027. In other words, the tire industry is an essential business. Where some franchises have been extremely damaged by the pandemic — think of escape room franchises or entertainment center franchises — people are still buying tires. It’s a need versus a want (or a “might be nice to have”).

Work with a business you feel good about.

That may be the most important thing. We think you’ll find a lot to like about Tread Connection. It’s a company that marries services and convenience, two features that our competitors often ignore. (Think about all the times you’ve had to take your car to a garage and wait in a waiting room for repairs, or worse, have a family member or friend with another car take you home, so you can come to the garage the next day to pick up your car, and to do so, you’ll need a ride.)

People want convenience. We think that’s a trend that’s not going to go away. Tread Connection, of course, comes to the customer to install tires. Meanwhile, the lack of a brick and mortar location makes it a far more cost-effective business for our franchisees.

So if you’re thinking of buying a car-related franchise, Tread Connection might be the best place to start.

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

If you don’t think about tires often, you probably don’t know your tire’s size. Why would you? And yet, whenever in the past you shop tires and tire services, it’s probably the first question asked. Invariably, the question is: “What tire size would you like?”

And that’s when many of us will come up with a clever retort like, “Uh…” Or maybe: “Er…”

So if you’re looking to have a ready answer, we’ll walk you through how to determine your tire size. Of course, if you are not interested in learning how to calculate tire size, and you just want somebody from Tread Connection to tell you what tire size you need and then install the tires, well, hey, we can do that, too.

But if you are interested in calculating tire sizes, here we go.

How to determine your tire size

You’ll need to find some important numbers in order to calculate your tire size — but that isn’t difficult. The numbers, as you might expect, are on the sides of your tires. If it’s too faint to read, or you just don’t feel like stooping down to look at your tires, you’ll possibly also find the numbers on the driver’s side door jamb, the glove box door, or on the gas tank hatch, and failing that, it’ll be in your vehicle’s owner’s manual.

You’re going to see an alphabet soup’s worth of letters and numbers, like (just as an example), P205/60R15 82S. Consider this your tire size code, and we’ll help you crack it.

  • Tire Type. Chances are, you probably will have a “P” on the tire. That stands for “passenger vehicle tire.” That would include vehicles like SUVs, minivans, and even small pickup trucks. If you see an “LT,” you have a larger vehicle. It stands for “light truck tire,” the type of truck that can tow a trailer or has a 1-ton load capacity. “ST” stands for “Special Trailer.” Those are tires for trailers. If there’s no letter, you have a metric tire, which is known as a European size.
  • Tire Width. In our example, that’s 205 mm. There are 205 millimeters per inch.
  • Aspect Ratio. That would be the 60 in our example. The aspect ratio is the percentage that compares the tire’s section height with the tire’s section width. So, in this case, the tire’s section height is 60 percent of the tire’s section width. Confusing, yes, but the main thing to remember here is that, if safety is your primary concern, you want the aspect ratio to be 70 or a lower number. You’ll get better steering and better overall handling.
  • Construction Type. In our example, the “R” is next. That stands for radial construction. If you see a “B,” that means belted bias. A “D” is diagonal bias construction. Odds are, you have radial tires. Radial ply construction is an industry standard, for what it’s worth.
  • Wheel Diameter. The next number in our example is “15.” That’s the diameter of the wheel rim, which is usually measured in inches.
  • Load Index. Next in the example is “82,” which is a number that you use in a chart, which will tell you how much weight your car can carry.
  • Speed Rating. The last letter – “S” is our example – you use with another chart, and it’ll tell you how fast your car can go before your tires start to have a problem, like a blowout. An “S,” in this case, means that your car could go 112mph before your tires would possibly, well, explode.

How to calculate your tire size

So that was a lot of information, and maybe your eyes are glazed over, and your brain feels as if it’s fogging up.

But if that still seems too overwhelming, just contact the TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection. We can help you quickly calculate your tire size. Not to worry.

Another helpful hint — you’ll want to stay within 3 percent of the diameter and height of the original tire. If you go further, you could have trouble with your brakes. Again, if this is confusing, and it often is to anybody who isn’t immersed in tires, a Tread Connection representative can help you with that.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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