Category: Gilbert

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Summer is here and it is a perfect time to get out and drive.  In this article, we are talking about the best summer tires that you can install to improve your vehicle’s traction on dry roads.

Summer tires are focused on speed, handling, and grip. With dry roads, summer tires are better suited to handle the twists and turns of the road. With dozens of choices of brands, it’s hard to find the right one, so we will explore 5 choices.

Michelin Pilot Sport 4S

A personal favorite, and one our Tread Connection team sees quite often, the Michelin Pilot Sport 4S offers a very powerful blend of dry road and wet road performance for your car. Although higher priced, these tires are ideal for higher end cars, rear-wheel drive cars, and of course those track days. 

Bridgestone Potenza RE760 Sport

Bridgestone has enhanced their performance with these tires by offering a new tread compound to increase the grip to the road, and with its 3D center block tread design, the life span of these tires are much longer than that of the competition.

Michelin Pilot Super Sport

With a low emitting sound and a double steel belt within it, the Pilot Super Sport offers a near perfect summer tire for anyone’s ride. Although on the more expensive side of tires, it’s because of the technology offered by Michelin to ensure there is low cabin noise, fantastic handling in the corners, and an unbeatable warranty of 30,000 miles! Again, these can be found on most exotic and supercars as an OEM tire, which goes to show that they can handle the power from these cars.

Continental ExtremeContact Sport

With a strong resistance to hydroplaning, and a very responsive grip in the corners, the Continental Extreme Contact Sport offers one of the best high performance tires on the market this year. A few downsides to this include the noise, and decreased fuel economy which should be taken into consideration with a daily commuter car. 

Bridgestone Potenza S-04 Pole Position

Rounding out our top 5 is another great tire offered by Bridgestone. The Potenza S-04 Pole Position enhances the drivers cornering and steering capability all the while in dry and wet conditions. It should be noted that this tire does not come with a tread warranty, and with that said, the tread life itself does not last as long as others. 

Contact your local Tread Connection

No matter which tire you choose, be sure to allow the Tread Connection team to source and install them on your vehicle right at your home or office.  Tires are an important investment, and we want to help get you set up with the best possible choice. 

Contact your local Tread Connection team to schedule your tire installation.

2307

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Most drivers have a good idea about the benefits of doing regular maintenance on their vehicle but knowing what service to have done (and when) is a different story.

Every so often, it becomes necessary to mount a new set of tires on a vehicle, whether that’s by choice or by necessity. You might simply want to install different tires to switch from summer to winter tires or you might be forced into the situation with an unexpected flat that demands a new purchase.

Some DIY enthusiasts or those looking to avoid trips to the shop might try to mount tires onto their vehicle by themselves. But while there are certainly those who know how to perform tire mounting at home, it’s easy to overlook some of the essential aspects of the process, such as properly balancing the tires when mounting.

Whether you are an expert looking for a refresher or are a beginner wondering how to do tire mounting yourself, let’s dive into the specifics involved in the process.

What Is Tire Mounting and Tire Balancing?

Simply put, tire mounting is the procedure of installing tires onto the wheels, which are then installed onto the car’s axle.

Tire balancing is the most complex part of the tire mounting process. When you mount tires, it’s essential that they are properly centered on the wheel to ensure the smoothest ride. But doing so is a difficult process without the technology available to the pros.

Can I Do This Myself?

It is certainly possible for dedicated car enthusiasts to perform both tire mounting and tire balancing at home, although it is much more difficult and requires more effort without the proper equipment — especially the balancing process.

Professionals use tire mounting machines as well as various kinds of balancing equipment and technology. When installing tires, professionals can balance them through a method called road force balancing, pressing a roller against the tires while they spin, simulating the contact the tire would have with a road and analyzing the balance until it is complete. They also might perform a procedure called spin balancing, which allows much of the same analysis while simply spinning the tire at a high rate in the air. From there, professional tire installers can shift the weight on the wheel until the tires are balanced.

These are procedures that many professionals become experts at performing, so while it’s possible to do them yourself, it could be well worth your time, money, and effort to ask a pro to handle it.

What Could Go Wrong?

As with most instances of DIY car maintenance, improper tire mounting and tire balancing can both lead to issues when you get back on the road. It is extremely important to ensure these processes are handled with care and detail to avoid any of those mishaps.

When a tire is not mounted or balanced correctly, it will be fairly obvious because of the vibrations you’ll feel. Tires might be mounted with too much lubricant that could cause slipping during braking or acceleration. If a tire is going to slip, it’ll likely happen shortly after it has been mounted. That could throw the tires back out of balance even if you did that aspect of the process correctly.

Improper balance is more common among amateur maintenance because it is more complex. When driving, an imbalanced tire will likely vibrate as well because of its misalignment with the wheel’s center of gravity.

Not only will those vibrations make for a more uncomfortable ride, but the constant vibration could likely cause quicker wear on your tires. That, of course, means you are spending more money and going through the headaches of the process once again!

Contact Tread Connection

For those deciding that it may be simpler to let the professionals handle processes as complex as tire mounting and balancing, Tread Connection is here to help. Not only are the experts at Tread Connection some of the industry’s most knowledgeable, but they also work with industry-leading technology and equipment to ensure your tires are ready for the road.

Best of all, the pros at Tread Connection make it easy by coming to you. Mobile tire service allows you to have these procedures done whenever and wherever makes the most sense for your schedule. If you need to have your tires mounted and balanced but need to have it done in your driveway or in the parking lot at work, call your nearest Tread Connection location today!

2754

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Everyone has preferences when it comes to their vehicles. From the look to the performance, everyone wants something different out of their car or truck.

One of those common preferences is the size of the tires, and more specifically, the size of the wheels on which the tires would be installed. It has long been popular among car and truck enthusiasts to experiment with the size of their wheels. Not only does that change the look of the vehicle — which is what many drivers who opt for the change are going for — but changing the size of the wheel can also make a difference in the style and the feel of the drive.

For those who make those changes, the difference in style, feel, and look are benefits. But there is the possibility of issues arising if an ill-fitting set of wheels is put on the wrong vehicle. For that reason, it’s essential that drivers understand what goes into selecting a wheel for their car or their truck.

Let’s dive into the specifics of how the pros determine which wheels fit on which vehicles and, since it’s often done by amateur car enthusiasts, what issues might arise if done incorrectly.

How Do You Know What Size Wheels Fit on My Car?

When determining the correct size of wheels for any vehicle, it’s essential to find what is called the proper “fitment.” There are several factors that go into finding the right fitment for every wheel and vehicle.

Those factors ensure the ability to mount the wheel as well as proper clearance in relation to the suspension. They include (among many other considerations) bolt patterns, offset, and of course, the size and type of wheel.

Bolt Pattern

Starting with the bolt pattern, it’s important to determine a wheel will be properly mounted onto the vehicle. A bolt pattern is comprised of two parts: the number of lugs and the centerline measurement between them. Wheels and vehicles come with different bolt patterns, some with four, five, six, or eight lugs. Depending on the size, they also have different measurements. If there are five lugs, or wheel studs, measure from the center of one lug to the outside of the farthest lug. If there are four, six, or eight, measure from the center of one straight across to the center of the opposite lug.

If a wheel has a bolt pattern of 4×110, then that means there are four lugs, and the centerline measurement between them is 110 mm.

Wheel Offset

Because many drivers opting for different wheel sizes are doing so for either the look or performance, the offset is an important factor in achieving your desired effect. Wheel offset is the difference between the mounting point and the centerline of the wheel, and is usually referred to as a negative offset or a positive offset.

If a wheel has a positive offset, it will likely sit more inside the wheel well. The opposite is true for wheels with negative offset, which extend further away from the vehicle.

Backspacing is another consideration that often coincides with the offset. It refers to the measurement from the mounting point to the back of the wheel. It’s important to have the right balance of offset and backspacing to avoid any clearance issues.

Sizing

It’s common for drivers wanting to change their wheels to opt for larger sizes, which is generally called “plus sizing.” While boosting the size of your wheel is certainly possible, it’s important to ensure the tire you fit onto the wheel has a low enough profile so you can maintain the same total stock diameter that has been defined as safe for your vehicle.

Issues With Ill-Fitted Wheels

As with any change to your vehicle, it is essential to do your research and prepare before making those decisions. As mentioned in the considerations above, there are plenty of issues that could arise if they are not handled properly. For one, we mentioned clearance issues, whether that is with the fender or with brake pads or other parts. You might also encounter some vibrations or rubbing, which put a strain on the wheels and the vehicle.

In general, you can sometimes expect a change in the way your drive feels, even when done correctly. Larger wheels can give some adventure and offer a sportier experience but might also cause a little less comfort on the ride. For some drivers, that’s the point! For others, it’s good to keep in mind before making the call to change your wheel set-up.

Call the Pros

While there are certainly a variety of factors to consider when changing the size of your wheels, you don’t have to do it alone!

Call the mobile tire professionals at Tread Connection to guide you through the process, from education such as our tire size calculator guide to an in-person consultation.

2768

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Every driver is different. So is every drive.

Luckily, there is a tire to fit nearly any need on or off the road. From the everyday all-season options to the most aggressive mud tires that off-road enthusiasts prefer, specific tires are available to fit specific situations. That is especially the case for drivers who want the ability to drive on everyday roads while getting the most performance out of their vehicle.

Street tires offer the ability to perform the best of both worlds, from those everyday commuters to those looking for a high-performance option for their sportier rides. Whichever way you want to drive, it is important to have confidence in a tire’s ability to grip the road and respond to your preferred style of driving.

So what allows street tires to fill so many different roles? Let’s take a look at some of the characteristics and what you should look for in a reliable, affordable tire.

Handling

Though some more adventurous drivers opt for more extreme tires such as all-terrain or off-road alternatives, manufacturers have pavement in mind when rolling out street tires. These options are the best on the market for drivers who want confidence that their tires will have responsive handling when they maneuver around corners and safely navigate in and out of traffic, as well as the ability to brake quickly when necessary. Every driver wants tires that can respond to your desired actions when gripping the steering wheel.

All-Season Reliability

One of the hallmarks of quality street tires is reliable performance in road conditions of all kinds. The best all-season tires are the options that keep their traction and performance in various situations. Whether the road is dry or wet, or if the temperatures are hot or cold or snowy, you should have confidence that the tire will still get you from Point A to Point B safely and comfortably. Still, many drivers want more out of their street tires than simple practicality.

High Performance

For drivers of sportier and luxury vehicles, high-performance street tires are a popular choice. Sometimes, an everyday all-season touring tire is not enough. After all, you chose that vehicle for a reason, and you want to get the most out of the driving experience. Many of these tires offer the same handling and all-season grip as an all-season tire but with the added benefit of allowing drivers to have confidence at higher speeds and situations that would put more strain on everyday tires.

Signs of Great Street Tires

Those characteristics and abilities of various street tires are made possible because of the specific designs that you should look for when shopping for a new set. First, most all-season tires have sipes that help eject water and snow from the tires, providing better grip in wet conditions. Many of them, especially tires cited as high performance, are designed with an asymmetric tread pattern that boosts the handling abilities by improving traction between the tire and the pavement. A number of street tires are also built with sturdy but flexible rubber and tread compounds that won’t stiffen and lose grip in the cold and won’t wear too quickly at high speeds.

Cost

Everyone wants a great deal, but drivers who are looking for tires enter the purchasing process with a variety of budgets. The good news is that there is a tire that can fit almost any cost barrier. Several quality all-season touring options can be found at or around $100 for the everyday driver — sometimes a little less. For those looking for a higher performance option, they can expect higher costs. Still, while some premium tires could get as expensive as $300 or more, there are plenty of quality products available at lower price points. You don’t have to break the bank to have confidence in your tires, and you don’t have to break the bank to have some adventure either!

Let the Pros Help

Of course, the average driver shopping for new street tires might not be able to decipher the difference between similar products, aside from any cost differences. However, there are professionals who are willing and available to guide you through the shopping process. They can determine which tires best fit your driving habits, and which would actually fit on your vehicle in the first place!

Tread Connection, the mobile tire service experts, can not only guide you through your decision but can help you make the replacement at a time and place of your choosing!

1633

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Tire Load Rating: How To Easily Determine Load Capacity

Tires must be able to support the vehicle’s weight, which is why it’s crucial that you pay attention to load rating. Here’s how to calculate your load rating.

Imagine yourself preparing to enter a tire shop, needing to buy a brand-new set of tires.

Whether you are thrust into the process because of an emergency like a blowout, or it is just time to upgrade from your set of aging tires, it is often a complex process.

That’s because there are so many ways drivers evaluate their tires when in the shopping process. The most common include seasonal options such as the choice between winter tires or all-season tires. There are also factors such as the amount of fun you want — which may lead you to mud tires or all-terrain tires. In most circumstances, those are the general areas.

But beyond the decision of what kind of tire you need for the kind of driving you want to do, there are some more in-depth details that the average driver may not consider. One of these factors is the tire load rating, a concept that is often overlooked in the tire shopping process but can impact both your tires and your vehicle’s capacity overall.

What Is A Tire Load Rating?

At its most basic level, a tire load rating specifies the tire’s maximum amount of load-carrying capacity. It determines how much weight, or “max load”, the vehicle can carry when those tires are at the correct pressure.

Tires are constructed with specific uses in mind. Much like mud tires featuring a distinct tread design and extremely durable rubber compounds, some tires are made to carry a certain amount of weight depending on the style of tire.

But how do you discover what the load rating is for any specific tire?

If you look at the sidewall of a tire, you’ll notice several numbers, letters, and symbols. They may not mean anything to the average driver, but those details lay out the tire’s specifications. Reading a tire’s sidewall can help you determine whether the tires have the right size, speed rating, and load rating for your vehicle. Tire sidewalls often have what is called a tire load index, which is another way of determining the amount of weight the tire could safely carry.

How Do I Put Those Numbers To Use?

When buying tires, it’s important to account for the size of your vehicle and how you plan to use it. Some smaller vehicles may not need a very high load rating. Larger vehicles such as trucks or SUVs, however, demand tires that have the capacity to hold not only the weight of the vehicle but everything they might be tasked with carrying.

Remember to also factor in that additional weight when shopping for tires. The max load might cover the weight of your truck, for example, but not the lumber you plan to haul every so often. It’s better to plan to have plenty of buffer between your tire load rating and its usual use.

Let The Pros Guide You

If you’re shopping for tires alone, it’s important to include all of these factors — including the load index and other specifications — into your consideration. Tire sidewalls can tell you what a tire offers, but you should also learn what your vehicle needs. Much of that information can be found in the vehicle’s operating manual. Another possible strategy to use is that if you bought a car new, it’s likely safe to assume the tires that came with it have the proper load index, so opt for tires that have that rating or higher in the next set you put on your vehicle.

Of course, you don’t always have to shop alone.

There are plenty of tire professionals in your area who can guide you through the process and simplify the variety of considerations – all through a stress-free conversation. If you feel like you may need help navigating the process, contact Tread Connection for tire services that come to you, ensuring you combine the peace of mind with the convenience of mobile tire shopping experience brought to your home or workplace.

2860