Author: lazarus

Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

If you don’t think about tires often, you probably don’t know your tire’s size. Why would you? And yet, whenever in the past you shop tires and tire services, it’s probably the first question asked. Invariably, the question is: “What tire size would you like?”

And that’s when many of us will come up with a clever retort like, “Uh…” Or maybe: “Er…”

So if you’re looking to have a ready answer, we’ll walk you through how to determine your tire size. Of course, if you are not interested in learning how to calculate tire size, and you just want somebody from Tread Connection to tell you what tire size you need and then install the tires, well, hey, we can do that, too.

But if you are interested in calculating tire sizes, here we go.

How to determine your tire size

You’ll need to find some important numbers in order to calculate your tire size — but that isn’t difficult. The numbers, as you might expect, are on the sides of your tires. If it’s too faint to read, or you just don’t feel like stooping down to look at your tires, you’ll possibly also find the numbers on the driver’s side door jamb, the glove box door, or on the gas tank hatch, and failing that, it’ll be in your vehicle’s owner’s manual.

You’re going to see an alphabet soup’s worth of letters and numbers, like (just as an example), P205/60R15 82S. Consider this your tire size code, and we’ll help you crack it.

  • Tire Type. Chances are, you probably will have a “P” on the tire. That stands for “passenger vehicle tire.” That would include vehicles like SUVs, minivans, and even small pickup trucks. If you see an “LT,” you have a larger vehicle. It stands for “light truck tire,” the type of truck that can tow a trailer or has a 1-ton load capacity. “ST” stands for “Special Trailer.” Those are tires for trailers. If there’s no letter, you have a metric tire, which is known as a European size.
  • Tire Width. In our example, the width is 205 millimeters.
  • Aspect Ratio. That would be the 60 in our example. The aspect ratio is the percentage that compares the tire’s section height with the tire’s section width. So, in this case, the tire’s section height is 60 percent of the tire’s section width. Confusing, yes, but the main thing to remember here is that, if safety is your primary concern, you want the aspect ratio to be 70 or a lower number. You’ll get better steering and better overall handling.
  • Construction Type. In our example, the “R” is next. That stands for radial construction. If you see a “B,” that means belted bias. A “D” is diagonal bias construction. Odds are, you have radial tires. Radial ply construction is an industry standard, for what it’s worth.
  • Wheel Diameter. The next number in our example is “15.” That’s the diameter of the wheel rim, which is usually measured in inches.
  • Load Index. Next in the example is “82,” which is a number that you use in a chart, which will tell you how much weight your car can carry.
  • Speed Rating. The last letter – “S” is our example – you use with another chart, and it’ll tell you how fast your car can go before your tires start to have a problem, like a blowout. An “S,” in this case, means that your car could go 112mph before your tires would possibly, well, explode.

How to calculate your tire size

So that was a lot of information, and maybe your eyes are glazed over, and your brain feels as if it’s fogging up.

But if that still seems too overwhelming, just contact the TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection. We can help you quickly calculate your tire size. Not to worry.

Another helpful hint — you’ll want to stay within 3 percent of the diameter and height of the original tire. If you go further, you could have trouble with your brakes. Again, if this is confusing, and it often is to anybody who isn’t immersed in tires, a Tread Connection representative can help you with that.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

You’ve got a lot on your mind, and probably the last thing you typically think about is your tire speed rating. But if you’re in the market for tire services, that’s not a bad thing to know. Even if you’re not looking for new tires any time soon, it’s a good thing to understand what a tire speed rating is.

What Is a Tire Speed Rating And Why Should You Care?

In a nutshell, it’s a rating that indicates the maximum speed that tires can safely maintain over time.

While speed limits can vary across the country (and around the world), the speed rating on a tire has a lot more to do with matching the speed capability of the tire to the top speed capability of the car to which they’re applied. The higher the speed rating, the better control and handling you can expect at higher speeds – basically it’s that the tires can take the heat.

How to Determine What Tire Speed Rating is Right for Your Car

You can find your tire speed rating in your car. Generally, you’ll find it on the driver’s side door jamb or sometimes in the glove box door or on the gas tank hatch, and if you don’t see it there, it’ll definitely be in your vehicle’s owner manual.

Now, you may see the tire speed rating on, say, the driver’s side door jamb and not even realize you’re looking at it. You may see a lot of numbers and letters, like P205/60R15 82S. Don’t worry about all of them. The main thing you’ll want to know is that the “S” signifies the tire speed rating, and the 82 is your load index, which corresponds with how much weight the car can carry.

If it sounds confusing, it is. After all, an “S” isn’t a speed, and 82 pounds sounds like not much weight at all. But if you’re thinking you can only go S miles per hour and carry 82 pounds, as you’ve likely surmised, you’re reading it wrong.

Deciphering the Tire Speed Rating and Load Index

First of all, if you don’t want to decipher the tire speed rating or load index, you don’t have to. If you see that you have an 82S at the end of those numbers and letters, or perhaps a 91V or a 99Y and so on, and you don’t want to bother with thinking too hard about all of this, just make sure that the tires you get are the same as what you’re seeing on the driver’s side door jamb, glove box door, gas tank hatch or vehicle’s owner manual (wherever you found it).

You can call your local Tread Connection franchise, and they’ll be able to help you.

But if you do want to go into the weeds, as you look at 82S or 91V or whatever those last two numbers and letter is, you’ll want to flip through your vehicle owner’s manual and look for two charts.

The S, V, Y, or other letters that you’ll see is your speed rating, and it will correspond with a speed.

What Are the Speed Ratings for Tires?

We’ll give them all to you here, so you don’t have to look it up.

  • L is 75 miles per hour
  • M is 81 miles per hour
  • N is 87 miles per hour
  • P is 93 miles per hour
  • Q is 99 miles per hour
  • R is 106 miles per hour
  • S is 112 miles per hour
  • T is 118 miles per hour
  • U is 124 miles per hour
  • H is 140 miles per hour
  • V is 149 miles per hour
  • Z is over 149 miles per hour
  • W is 168 miles per hour
  • Y is 186 miles per hour

The load index also corresponds with a chart, which you’ll find in your book. These charts are insanely long and heavy on numbers, and so we’ll spare you from wading through it all, but basically if your load index is, say, 96, you’d be able to look for the pounds the car can carry, and in this case, 96 corresponds with 1,565 pounds per tire. Multiply four times 1,565, and you’d find that the maximum weight of your car is 6,260 pounds.

Buying a Tire With the Right Speed Rating and Load Index

So as noted, the main thing is that you buy a tire with the same speed rating as what’s in your owner’s manual – or a tire that’s even better. So if your speed rating letter is “S,” but you’d like to buy a “T,” go ahead. But if you want to buy an “R,” it’s better to not.

That can sound a little strange. After all, R is 106mph, and you probably never go anywhere near that speed. Why not buy an R?

Because your car manufacturer spent a lot of time and money testing your cars on S tires. That’s what it determined you need. Putting a better tire on your car is perfectly fine but putting a lesser tire than what your car manufacturer recommends — even if it doesn’t seem like a big deal, we can’t in good conscience suggest that.

And when you buy tires, you’ll want to make sure that you don’t ever buy tires with a lower load-carrying capacity than the tires originally installed by your car manufacturer.

You Don’t Have to Think About Any of This — Let the Experts at Tread Connection Think About Tire Speed Ratings and Load Index for You

Now that you know more about tire speed ratings and load indexes, you should be able to make a more informed decision on your next set of tires. But if you’re thinking, “This is clear as mud,” or, “I understand tire speed ratings and load indexes now, but I still don’t want to deal with this,” then no worries.

The TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection will quickly determine all of that information once they show up at your home and office — and then can quickly mount and install your tires and then will be on their way.

And you can forget all about tire speed ratings and the load index for a long, long time.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

What do you think of when you hear the word “backspacing”? We’re not talking about your computer keyboard. We’re talking about your car! Wheel offset and backspacing are important when it comes to measuring how your wheel mounts on your car. They impact the look and feel of your car, as well as its safety.

However, these are also two different numbers measuring very different things. Here’s what drivers need to know about backspacing and wheel offset to ensure they always find the right tires for their vehicle and that they are installed correctly.

What is Wheel Offset and How Do I Measure It?

Your wheel offset is the distance from where you mount your wheel to the wheel’s center. The centerline is the literal “center” of the width of your wheel. This centerline is also known as a 0 mm offset. That’s important to note because your wheel offset is always measured in millimeters.

When you see any offset measurements on your wheels, those are millimeters. Make sure you always have your measurements correct, or the consequences could be catastrophic!

Once you’ve found the centerline, simply take a tape measure and measure between the center and the mounting surface (where the bolts are). Anything over or under this line is called a negative offset or a positive offset. Both of these mean different things and have a different impact on your car and how it drives.

  • If you’re measuring from the center and going toward the outside of the vehicle (the street side), then that’s a positive offset. This is when the wheel and tire are more flush with the outside of the car.
  • If the measurement starts at the center and moves inward toward your brakes and suspension, this is a negative offset. This creates a more convex appearance that dips inward.

But what are negative offsets and positive offsets, and how do they impact your vehicle?

What is a Negative Offset for My Wheels?

A negative offset is when you mount your wheel closer to the mounting hub toward the inside of your vehicle. The negative offset makes wheels stick out more and helps to give that iconic “deep dish” look to bigger wheels.

Wide wheels and tires often require a negative offset to make more space for everything. The negative offset helps it to better fill out the wheel well while also ensuring your wheel and tire don’t get too close to your suspension.

If you’re getting a set of bigger and wider tires like mud tires, then you will likely require a negative offset to account for the added size.

What is a Positive Offset for My Wheels?

By comparison, a positive offset is when the wheel is mounted further away from the centerline (toward the street). When you purchase a new vehicle, there’s a good chance it will have a slightly positive offset.

3-Steps to Measure Wheel Offset

One more time, this is how you measure the wheel offset on your vehicle.

  1. Remove the wheel and accurately measure the width.
  2. Find the centerline of the wheel.
  3. Measure from the centerline to the mounting hub and record it in millimeters.

What is Backspacing, How Do I Measure It, and How Is It Different From Wheel Offset?

Now that you have a better understanding of wheel offset, it’s time to explore your backspacing. Unlike your wheel offset, backspacing is a bit more self-explanatory. It’s the space between the wheel mounting hub and the inside lip (or back) of the wheel.

3 Steps to Measure Backspacing

Measuring your backspacing is similar to your wheel offset with some key differences. Here is how you can measure it on your vehicle.

  1. Attach the wheel to your mounting hub.
  2. Using your tape measure, measure from the mounting hub to the back lip of the wheel.
  3. Record the number in inches.

It’s important to always make sure the backspacing on your wheels is correct. Manufacturers set a maximum requirement so that your wheel doesn’t get too close to your brakes or suspension.

Be sure that whatever new wheels or tires you buy will work with your vehicle. If you’re not sure whether or not your wheels will fit, it may be time to ask the experts!

Trust the Experts at Tread Connection for Offset, Backspacing, and Installation

Now that you know more about wheel offset and backspacing, you should be able to make a more informed decision on your next set of tires. However, you may not want to deal with taking these measurements yourself. With such exact measurements, even being off by a few millimeters can have a profound impact on your vehicle.

The TIA-certified tire experts at Tread Connection have the knowledge and skills to provide the accurate tire services you need. And thanks to Tread Connection’s convenient and efficient mobile tire service, you can have your tires mounted and installed from the safety and comfort of your home or office.

Contact a Tread Connection van in your area to get the perfect set of tires for your vehicle today!

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

Delivery has never been more popular than it is now. What was once the purview of mail-order shopping and pizzas has become routine for how most Americans find their favorite products. Now, other industries are taking notice and cashing in on convenience.

From shipping through Amazon to cashing checks online with their phones, people can now live more of their lives without ever having to leave the couch. This has had a huge impact on the way customers view other services as well, including tire services!

Learn what you need to know about the rise of mobile business and why the future of tire sales and other services brings the service to the customer, not the other way around.

Customers Want More Than Goods Delivered, They Want Services Too

There’s no question that Amazon has forever changed the way people think about delivery. The popularity of the online juggernaut has made it easier than ever to order everything from your weekly groceries to an entire house and have it delivered to your door.

It’s clear that you can order just about anything online, but people want more than just products at home; they also want services! And we’re talking about more than traditional home services like HVAC, cleaning, or plumbing.

Customers want services that were once unique to brick-and-mortar stores from the convenience of home. Chief among these services making the leap are at-home tire services. Thanks to the latest technology, mobile tire workstations like those from Tread Connection are a convenient tire shop on wheels!

People Value Their Time as Much as Their Money

They say that time is money, and there’s definitely something to be said for that these days. In fact, time is more valuable than money for many people. This is a big reason why so many customers are willing to pay for a service that helps them save time while providing them with precious freedom during the day.

A trip to a typical tire shop has long been a dreaded experience, with hours spent in cramped and congested waiting rooms. This often means taking time off of work and sacrificing valuable vacation hours. If you’re lucky, you might have a laptop and a waiting room with wi-fi to work from the tire shop, but it’s hardly a place designed for productivity.

Mobile businesses take the brick-and-mortar store out of the equation. By meeting the customer at their home or office on their schedule, people can find and install a full set of tires without ever having to leave their couch or desk. The result is that people get their day back and save valuable time that they would rather use doing something else.

Customers Want Convenience

And it’s more than time that is driving the rise of the mobile business model. Customers have also become accusomted to convenience. They want this same convenience extended to other parts of their lives as well.

Many of the services that are essential to our daily lives can now be accessed directly from our phones. Everything from school to doctor’s visits can be ordered and scheduled online. This has led customers to ask why tire services can’t be just as convenient.

A mobile business such as a mobile tire franchise does more than deliver tires direct to someone’s door. They also install, repair, and service tires at someone’s home or office. Now, instead of driving on a spare or getting a tow to the nearest shop, the customer can bring the shop to them!

Customers are Less Willing to Wait at Stores

As convenience and online ordering become commonplace, many customers are less willing to spend time waiting in a cramped waiting room. The lingering anxiety of the coronavirus pandemic has taken the trend and amplified it by adding the risk of viral infection to the mix.

Most people aren’t even comfortable eating inside a restaurant, much less sitting for hours in an auto shop waiting room. While many businesses are doing everything they can to improve sanitation and encourage social distancing, the fear of infection is still in the back of many people’s minds.

Why would someone choose to put themselves at risk when they could avoid the risk entirely? The solution for many people has been to forgo leaving the home and instead bring their essential services directly to them.

Take the Tire Shop to Your Customers With Tread Connection!

By combining the safety of touchless service with the convenience of at-home delivery, a mobile business like a Tread Connection franchise is perfectly positioned to not only handle the current economic climate but also stay at the front of a growing trend that is ready to become the norm.

Are you ready to take advantage of a mobile business disrupting the way people across the country take care of their tires? See how you can start your Tread Connection franchise today!

 

 

 

BUY TIRES

 

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Categories: All Stores, ArrowheadAZ-124, AustinTX-104, BocaRaton-101, BrokenArrowOK-112, CasperWY-137, CharlotteNC-116, ClovisCA-113, ConcordNC-131, coronaNY-117, DC-102, DenverCO-106, DesMoines-134, FlowerMoundTX-140, gallowayoh-139, GastoniaNC-111, GatosCA-128, Gilbert, GreeleyCO-123, GreensboroNC-120, HoustonTX-114, LafayetteLA-118, LancasterPA-130, LubockTX-109, MidlandTX-103, MinneapolisMN-110, MooresvilleNC-105, NorwoodMA-127, RandolphNJ-126, RockHillSC-129, RTP-119, SaltLakeUT-122, SLO-115, SouthDavisUT-136, SouthRenoNV-132, SummerlinNY-133, TampaFL-108, ThorntonCo-138, Uncategorized, WeatherfordTX-125, WilcoTX-121

I need to replace my tires, and I’m on a budget. What are the qualities of a good economy tire? Is there anything I should avoid?

Everyone wants to find the best deal when it comes to buying a new set of tires. Purchasing a full set of tires can be an expensive proposition. It’s not surprising that many people look for an economy tire when it comes to purchasing their next set.

Of course, finding the right set of economy tires doesn’t mean settling for cheap tires. That’s why it is important to focus on value when it comes to tires, instead of just the price.

Here is what you need to know to ensure you’re getting the value you deserve on your next set of economy tires.

What Are You Using Your Tires For?

One of the first questions worth asking is the reason you’re buying tires in the first place. Obviously, you’re using your tires to get around. What we mean is if you’re using them for a specific purpose. If you’re getting specialty tires for a performance or off-road vehicle, then there are certain qualities you want to look for that may not be as important with a commuter vehicle.

Are you looking for an insane set of mud tires with the tread and traction you need to dominate the outdoors? Maybe you feel the need for speed and need a set of high-performance tires for racing a high-performance vehicle.

Think about what you want to get out of your tires and what’s important to you. Once you know what you’re looking for, you’ll be better prepared to find the right value.

Review The Tread Warranty

When you purchase a new set of tires, you want them to last as long as possible. Depending on how often you drive, the average set of tires usually lasts anywhere from three to five years. This translates to your tires lasting for close to 70,000 miles, provided you keep up with regular maintenance and don’t drive like a maniac.

Your tires probably come with what is called a “treadwear warranty” from the manufacturer that is good for up to a certain number of miles. This warranty may vary depending on the cost of your tires. Make sure you double-check your treadwear warranty because the difference could be anywhere from 5,000 to 20,000 miles, depending on the tire.

Check the Speed Rating

Another factor that can impact the price of your tires is the speed rating. This is usually indicated by a letter at the end of your tire model number. Depending on where you drive and how often you’re on the road, you may be tempted to choose a set of tires with a lower speed rating in order to save a few bucks.

If you have a short commute or don’t do much highway travel, then it may make sense for you to save with a slightly lower speed rating. However, if you spend a lot of time in your car or drive a high-performance vehicle, then you may want to consider a higher speed rating for both better handling and a safer ride overall.

Choose From the Best Selection

The best way to get the best value on your tires is to make sure you’re choosing from the best selection. Many tire shops can only offer what they have available at their location. If there’s a particular tire you want, then you may be out of luck. That means being forced to choose an option you’re not really happy with and pay more than you want.

By working with a tire service that features a wide selection of tires, you can find the right set of tires that works for your budget. Make sure you choose from a variety of the biggest and most popular brands to find the perfect set for your vehicle, instead of settling for what’s available.

Get Your Tires Delivered to Your Door

Now that you’ve found the tires you’re looking for, it’s time to find the best value in getting them installed. The best way to do this is to skip the auto shop altogether! Buy tires online with Tread Connection and find the value you deserve on your next set!

 

 

 

BUY TIRES

 

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